New Construction / International / 2016 /

03 - Energy

Information correct as of 19thJune 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.

Acceptable alternative strategies to sub-metering by floor plate - KBCN00071

An alternative sub-metering strategy, not based on a by-floor-plate basis, would be acceptable provided that: - it provides an equivalent, or more useful level of detail than sub-metering by floor plate. - it divides the assessment in a logical manner which provides useful information to building management re: energy use. - the approach does not conflict with requirements for sub-metering other functional areas. The intent of sub-metering by floor plate is to allow a large homogenous function (such as office space) to be split up into smaller areas that will allow building management to monitor, identify and influence areas of high energy use.  Alternatives that also meet this intent are also acceptable.

Accessibility of energy metering systems - KBCN0580

Energy metering systems should be accessible and the energy consuming end uses visible to building users, such as the facilities manager, where present, and/or other building occupants responsible for the management of the building.

Assessing equipment to be provided later by the tenant/occupier - KBCN0609

The efficiency of equipment to be provided as part of a subsequent fit-out falls outside the scope of this Issue. Likewise, in a fully fitted but speculative office, where an unknown future tenant will be providing, for example, their own computers, these computers are to be excluded from the assessment. Compliance must be demonstrated by the equipment fitted/installed within the scope of the development being assessed and, unless specifically stated otherwise, the use of commitments or legally-binding agreements is not accepted to demonstrate compliance for final certification within this BREEAM Scheme.
24/02/2017 CN amended to incorporate KBCN0701

Best Practice Specification - KBCN0763

The methodology intends to shape the best practice building into a single universal building specification that could be seen as best practice across all countries. Therefore energy performance is compared purely on physical information of buildings and relevant building systems. The BREEAM Best Practice Specification is used only to calibrate how credit scoring in Ene 01 is calculated for each country, allowing comparability between buildings. Where typical best practice differences exist between different building types, like for like comparisons are retained for buildings within each building type.

Best Practice Specification – actual U-values exceed best practice - KBCN1075

Where the actual building's thermal fabric performance (U-values) exceeds the BREEAM Best Practice Specification (BPS), resulting in better thermal performance, the BREEAM Best Practice Specification building will need to be modified to match the actual building's U-values, as stated in Guidance Note 25. For instance, if the actual building's roof U-value was 0.10 W/m2K, but the BPS was 0.15 W/m2K, the BPS building will need to be modified to include a roof with a U-value of 0.10 W/m2K.

Best Practice Specification – additional costs for new energy modelling - KBCN0766

The procedure for modelling the BREEAM Best Practice Specification is not designed to be difficult or complex. It requires the energy modelling specialist to update the specifications of the modeled building with the performance values of the BREEAM Best Practice Specification, re-run the simulation to provide the energy indicator results and save the model file. This step does not require any change to the geometry or building systems. It is understood that for large or complex projects, the change of performance specification and additional simulation run time will result in some additional work, however in relation to the overall scale of the project this is not considered a major disruption to workflow.

Best Practice Specification – shell only - KBCN0764

For shell only projects, services complying with the minimum energy efficiency standards or backstop levels required by the relevant national building regulations should be used for the energy modelling. The best practice specification should be used in the same way as for fully fitted buildings.

Best Practice Specification – values for different climatic zones - KBCN0765

Best practice building specifications for different climate zones do not currently exist but will be considered for future updates.

Calculating EPR where there are multiple BRUKLs - KBCN1083

Where more than one BRUKL is produced for a development, which is registered as a single assessment, an area-weighted average should be used to calculate the number of credits to be awarded. This does not apply where the ‘similar buildings’ approach is used. Each of the energy performance outputs from the BRUKL (actual CO2/m2 notional CO2/m2 etc.) must be area-weighted to produce area weighted average values which are entered into the scoring and reporting tool. When applying this method, please include your area-weighting calculations and outputs as supporting evidence. The following provides an example of an area-weighting calculation for two building areas A and B, each of 500m2, for which separate BRUKL are available: For building area A: Notional building heating and cooling energy demand: 230 mJ/m² Actual building heating and cooling energy demand: 200 mJ/m² Notional building primary energy consumption: 300 kWh/m² Actual building primary energy consumption: 280 kWh/m² TER: 40 kg CO₂-eq/m² BER: 30 kg CO₂-eq/m² For building area B: Notional building heating and cooling energy demand: 150 mJ/m² Actual building heating and cooling energy demand: 140 mJ/m² Notional building primary energy consumption: 200 kWh/m² Actual building primary energy consumption: 190 kWh/m² TER: 40 kg CO₂-eq/m² BER: 38 kg CO₂-eq/m² Area-weighted values for building areas A and B (of total floor area 1000m2): Notional building heating and cooling energy demand: 230*500/1000 + 150*500/1000 = 190 mJ/m² Actual building heating and cooling energy demand: 200*500/1000 + 140*500/1000 = 170 mJ/m² Notional building primary energy consumption: 300*500/1000 + 200*500/1000 = 250 kWh/m² Actual building primary energy consumption: 280*500/1000 + 190*500/1000 = 235 kWh/m² TER: 40*500/1000 + 40*500/1000 = 40 kg CO₂-eq/m² BER: 30*500/1000 + 38*500/1000 = 34 kg CO₂-eq/m² These area-weighted values are then used to calculate the overall EPRNC value.
31/10/2018 KBCN clarified. Reference to EPRs and calculation example added

Centralised air handling units (AHU) - KBCN0941

Where it is not technically feasible to separately meter energy use by floor plate or functional area of a centralised AHU, the requirements of the second credit do not need to be applied to the AHU. The credit will be assessed based on the rest of the energy uses applicable.

Combined sub-metering of electric heating and small power equipment - KBCN00068

For bedrooms and associated spaces in multi-residential or residential institution building types, it is acceptable, for an electric heating system to be combined with lighting and small power for metering purposes, provided that sub-metering is provided for each floor plate or other appropriate sub-division. For these building types, sub-metering electric heating in multiple bedrooms may be costly and technically challenging. Where occupants have individual control but are not responsible for paying the utilities bills, the building manager may have little influence on their energy consumption, therefore sub-metering electric heating would provide little or no benefit in meeting the aim of the Issue.  

Combined system for heating/cooling and domestic hot water - KBCN0329

Where a common plant that serves the heating / cooling and domestic hot water will be used and where it is not technically feasible to provide separate meters, it is permissible to provide combined metering. In such cases, a full justification by the design team must be provided in the QA report.

Communal Laundry Facilities – Domestic or Commercial Washing Machines - KBCN0613

The table provided in the manual highlights the criteria for an appliance to be considered domestic or commercial. However, for multi-residential projects (or other building types containing laundry facilities), the BREEAM assessor should use their judgement to determine whether the appliance is commercial or domestic, and justification of the category selected must be provided. For instance, commercial and domestic sized washing machines can be defined based on load size or power rating.

Communal Laundry Facilities- Commercial Sized Tumble Dryers - KBCN0555

Tumble dryers should be taken in to account when calculating the total annual unregulated energy consumption of communal laundry facilities with commercial sized appliances.  Heat recovery from a commercial sized tumble dryer exhaust can be used as an alternative to the solutions listed within the Ene 08 credit issue provided it will achieve a meaningful reduction of energy demand, and justification can be given as to why  this method has been implemented over those recommended in the manual.  The list of equipment types and compliance requirements is not intended to be exhaustive, however where alternative solutions are proposed, the design team must provide justification and evidence as outlined above, to the satisfaction of the assessor.

Counterbalancing ratio fixed - KBCN0327

The requirement to analyse the counterbalancing ratio can be omitted if the project team can provide a statement confirming that it has been set by the manufacturer due to existing standards and to maximise efficiency. The remaining criteria must be met.

Deemed to comply solutions – alternative proposals - KBCN1214

The solutions listed for each category in the Table are examples deemed to comply with the requirements, without further justification or calculations to demonstrate a meaningful reduction in unregulated energy consumption. If an alternative solution is proposed, justification and/or calculations are required to demonstrate this.

District heating systems – fuel mix - KBCN0885

Where the feasibility study is considering connection to a district heating system and this burns a mixture of fuels, only the proportion of output generated from second generation bio-fuels (or waste incineration that complies with BREEAM requirements) can be considered for this issue. For instance, a system burning a 25/75 mix of compliant biofuel vs fossil fuel can only count 25% of its output towards a meaningful reduction in CO2 emissions (where relevant to the BREEAM scheme) against the baseline building. As fuel mixes may vary over time, at least one year or more of historical information must be provided to balance out any seasonal variations. Where the system is new or proposed, robust evidence must be provided of the anticipated fuel mix. The fuel mix must be calculated based on the energy content of the input fuels in kWh.
19/12/2017 Wording clarified

Drying space in hotel/ hostel projects - KBCN0174

The Drying space issue is not applicable to projects where occupancy is transient, such as hotel or hostel type developments, but does apply to long term residential buildings. There is little potential in reducing the energy from drying clothes in hotel and hostel bedrooms compared to long term residential buildings.

Emergency lighting - KBCN0185

Maintained systems featuring emergency light fittings which are also used for normal operation, are assessed for this issue. Non-maintained lighting which is only activated in an emergency can be excluded from the assessment. The aim of this credit is to encourage and recognise external energy-efficient fittings. Non-maintained emergency lighting will very rarely be activated and in such extremes the emergency requirements must not be compromised.

Ene 01 software submission - KBCN0434

In countries with an existing National Calculation Methodology (NCM), the tool(s) approved for use under the NCM can be used as approved building energy calculation software without our prior approval, provided that the software conforms the following modelling requirements as set out in Directive 2002/91/EC on the energy performance of buildings (16 December 2002): (a) thermal characteristics of the building (shell and internal partitions, etc.) which may also include air-tightness; (b) heating installation and hot water supply, including their insulation characteristics; (c) air-conditioning installation; (d) ventilation; (e) built-in lighting installation; (f) position and orientation of buildings, including outdoor climate; (g) passive solar systems and solar protection; (h) natural ventilation; (i) indoor climatic conditions, including the designed indoor climate. Where the design team wishes to use an alternative modelling software package, the assessor should first check the Approved Standards and Weightings List to see if the software is listed there. If the software cannot be found in the ASWL, please download and fill out the Ene 01 Approval for Energy Software form from the BREEAM Extranet, and submit this to the BREEAM technical team via breeamtechnicalcs@bre.co.uk, along with the appropriate evidence.
25/09/2017 Clarified to include requirements of Directive 2002/91/EC

Energy consumption and carbon emissions of untreated spaces - KBCN00049

Where the assessment contains a mix of treated and untreated spaces, untreated spaces can be excluded and the performance based on the treated spaces only. Where the entire assessment is untreated, the whole of the structure(s) must be assessed on the basis that this issue is critical for certification. BREEAM is primarily designed to assess permanent, treated and occupied structures. Untreated structures are unlikely to gain many credits when being assessed.

Energy efficient laboratories – scope - KBCN1254

This Issue is also applicable to 'Offices with Research and development areas'  and other buildings with research and development facilities that contain laboratory space and containment devices/areas.
Technical manual to be updated accordingly in next reissue.

Energy monitoring and management systems and small useful floor areas - KBCN1361

The requirement for an energy monitoring and management system (Building Management System – BMS) applies to useful floor areas that are greater than 1,000 m2. For developments where useful areas are monitored by single utility meters (of the same fuel) and are smaller than 1,000m2, the BMS requirement is not applicable. This is because the value of monitoring given by a BMS is not appropriate for such small areas. For example, in a situation where a large building is served by several utility meters (of the same fuel), with none of them covering a useful floor area greater than 1,000 m2, the requirement for BMS is not applicable.

Energy performance assessment for part of a whole building - KBCN0596

If the assessment is only covering part of a whole building, the energy performance assessment must be representative of the part of the building being assessed. Simply taking the energy performance assessment of the whole building would not therefore comply, especially if the non-assessed parts of the building were of a different use. A separate energy assessment of the part of the building is likely to be required. The energy performance assessment must be representative of the parts of the building being assessed.  

Energy sub-metering – Single occupancy & function - KBCN0491

In large buildings of single occupancy/tenancy where there is only one homogeneous function (e.g. hotel bedrooms, offices), sub-metering should be provided per floor plate.  

Evacuation lifts - KBCN0437

Evacuation lifts, which will be used during an emergency only, can be excluded from the relevant BREEAM criteria. However, if these lifts are used during the normal operation of the building, then they still need to be assessed.

Excluding large untreated warehouse spaces from ‘Useful floor area’ - KBCN00069

For industrial buildings, where there are offices and the untreated warehouse space does not include any energy-intensive systems or processes, the warehouse space can be excluded from the calculation of 'useful floor area' to determine whether Criterion 2 or 3 (Criterion 2 only in UK New Construction 2018) is applicable. For speculative developments, if Planning Consent includes Distribution or Warehousing (UK Planning Use Class B8 or equivalent local planning consent) and the design team and assessor can justify that this is the intended use, the above approach can be followed for untreated warehouse space. Where there is minimal energy consumption, complex sub-metering such a space would add little benefit. 
Wording clarified and note added relating to speculative developments - 16/12/2016
Wording clarified relating to speculative developments - 06/01/2020

Extending a lift shaft - KBCN0802

Where the scope of works regarding a lift only includes extending the lift shaft to other floors, then assessment of this lift is not appropriate.  Where changes are made to the lift system, then assessment is required. Where changes to lift systems are made, these lifts need to be included in the assessment to encourage specification of energy efficient transport systems.

External lighting inside wider building - KBCN0906

Where a building undergoing assessment is located inside of another building, for example a retail unit within a shopping centre, Ene 03 External lighting and Pol 04 Reduction of night time light pollution should be assessed as follows; Ene 03 'External lighting' that is inside of the wider building, using the example above the lighting is external of the retail unit itself but inside of the wider shopping centre, criteria relating to the luminous efficacy should be applied as presented within the manual. For the criteria relating to controlled for prevention of operation during daylight hours and presence detection in areas of intermittent pedestrian traffic, however, instead of demonstrating that the lighting is not operational during daylight hours, it should be demonstrated that the lighting is not operational outside of the operational hours of the wider shopping centre. Any external lighting within the scope of works being assessed that is located outside of the wider shopping centre, for example if the retail unit had an entrance or exit that leads on to the street outside, this would need to be assessed against the criteria presented within the manual. Pol 04 If the building undergoing assessment has no external lighting that is outside of the wider building, it can be considered that the building has no external lighting. However, as above, any external lighting within the scope of works of the assessment that is located outside of the wider building will need to be assessed as the criteria is presented within the manual.
10/05/2019 Reference to specific criteria numbers removed and made applicable to UK NC2018

Feasibility study – comparison with connection to existing LZCs - KBCN0563

In carrying out a feasibility study (covering all the areas required as stated in the manual) the primary intent is to demonstrate to a reasonable level of certainty that the chosen LZC is the most appropriate of all those available. Some of the options (for example community heating/cooling schemes) may not allow for a simple like for like comparison but a comparison can be made overall across many factors. For example in a community heating scheme the life cycle costing estimate might need to be simply the cost of using and maintaining the system for the measuring period, if upfront costs and payback period information is not available. Similarly for an existing community scheme, planning would not be a barrier but land use and noise impacts could be compared. The feasibility study must include a comparison of all criteria and for it to show that each has been factored into the final option being made. While some options may provide information in different formats and differing levels of detail making direct comparisons not straightforward, a comparison can still be made and this should aim to be as comprehensive and representative as possible. This will serve to demonstrate with reasonable certainty that the chosen option is the most appropriate. 

GN25 BREEAM International New Construction 2016 Ene 01 Calc - KBCN0722

A new calculation methodology for determining the number of credits achieved in Ene 01 was introduced in BREEAM International New Construction 2013. The core principles of this methodology have been retained in BREEAM International New Construction 2016, but there have been some changes to the way in which the methodology is implemented. This guidance note describes the main Ene 01 methodology and provides further detail on how it is implemented in the 2016 scheme. View full Guidance Note (licensed assessors only) View all Guidance Notes (licensed assessors only)  

Head-end systems for smart meters - KBCN0933

As the central component in an Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), head end systems allow data communication and collation from a large and disparate set of smart meters. Where smart energy meters and sub-meters are to be installed, a head-end system is required for any strategy utilising this technology to be considered for compliance.

Individual and shared drying facilities in larger developments - KBCN0260

Individual bedrooms: an adequate internal or external space with posts and footings, or fixings capable of holding: This is to avoid over-provision of shared drying facilities in larger developments. 

International suitably qualified professionals - KBCN1266

In some issues the International NC and RFO schemes prescribe specific requirements for suitably qualified professionals. We appreciate that some countries might have different recognition schemes in place, and these might differ from the BREEAM requirements. Where this is the case, assessors should submit a technical query with appropriate information, and we will review and approve each situation on a country basis.

Internationally approved Ene 01 calculation software - KBCN1177

The following calculation software are approved internationally and can be used provided local weather files are available in the country of the assessment. Please make sure the approved version, in brackets, is used. If you wish to use a different one, please submit a technical query to BREEAMtechnicalcs@bre.co.uk providing details of the changes.

Laboratory facilities not restricted to building type - KBCN1340

In order to allow buildings with appropriate laboratory facilities to assess the energy performance of their labs, all assessments containing laboratory space and containment areas will be able to assess Issue ‘Energy efficient laboratory systems’, even where the relevant technical manual confirms that the Issue is not applicable to this building type. The Issue remains not applicable to primary and secondary school buildings given the limited scale of their laboratories. Assessments registered prior to 1 July 2019 have the choice to follow the guidance as stated in the technical manual. They can exclude laboratories by responding negatively to the questions regarding laboratory facilities. For assessments registered after this date, all projects containing laboratories within the scope of the assessment should include the Issue in the assessment.

LCC – LZC energy sources discounted - KBCN0606

When sufficient information can be provided to justify that LZC energy sources are not appropriate for the development, the LCC analysis, for those LZC sources, do not need to be included in the feasibility study. The feasibility study (covering all the areas required as stated in the manual) intends to demonstrate, to a reasonable level of certainty, that the chosen LZC is the most appropriate of all those available.

Lifts with speeds less than 0.15m/s - KBCN1146

Lifts with speeds less than 0.15m/s fall outside the scope of ISO 25745 and can, therefore, be excluded from the assessment of this Issue. This applies, for example, to lifts in single dwellings or those installed in other low-rise buildings, specifically for the use of persons with impaired mobility.

LZC technologies – energy centre or other LZCs connected at a later stage - KBCN0267

If a project specifies LZCs that have been proposed in the feasibility report which reduce emissions, and/or will be connected to a site-wide energy centre operational at a later stage of the phased development, after the Post Construction Stage review has been submitted, the Energy and Pollution issues can be assessed as follows: In a phased development where the primary heating system will be upgraded at a later stage than the building being assessed, a commitment to install the new heating source must be made in the General Contract Specification (as per the BREEAM requirements). BREEAM does not specify a particular time for phasing as it is difficult to set parameters, however as a rule building users should have to wait the least time possible before they can use the upgraded heating source. For the quality audit, two Energy model outputs/EPCs must be produced at the final stage - one with the actual interim system installed for building control, and one for the BREEAM assessment which can include the predicted energy from the proposed energy centre.  Additionally, the legally binding general contract specification for the new heating source must be submitted with details of the timescales proposed for the completion of the second phase of work. Where this approach is to be followed BREEAM must be consulted in each case to ensure that the arrangements are sufficiently robust to award the credits. BREEAM seeks to recognise the environmental impacts of a building's energy use throughout its life, therefore temporary arrangements can be accommodated, provided there is robust evidence on future connection to the permanent systems.

LZC technologies – planning conditions and restrictions - KBCN0535

Where a mandatory planning condition exists (eg to attach to a District Heating Scheme), this will clearly affect the number of options available in a feasibility study. In such cases, compliance can still be achieved where evidence on the planning condition restrictions is provided, and it is clarified how this excludes other technologies from being considered. The feasibility study will still need to be carried out to cover the remaining energy needs of the building (eg Electrical and lighting load in the case of a district heating scheme).  

LZC technologies – shell only feasibility study - KBCN0409

For a shell only project, compliance may be assessed on the built form only i.e. demonstrating that sufficient space and clearance for the installation of future LZCs has been considered, the built form is suitably sited, and that massing and orientation are optimised for the future systems.

Measures in CIBSE TM50 for Kitchen and catering facilities - KBCN0663

The measures are listed in the section summaries (blue boxes) in the guide. The sections that follow each summary in the Guide are explanations of the measures. Therefore you can refer to these parts if you need further clarification about the measures. When considering which measures to target, first discount any energy efficiency measures which are not applicable to the project, or are specifically excluded in the criteria. Of the remaining measures, where the criteria requires that two thirds or more are to be achieved always round up any figures. For instance if there are five applicable measures in a section, four will need to be achieved. If there are only two, both will need to be achieved. Many measures in TM50 require consideration of what is the best option or specification. The intent of our criteria is to demonstrate that these measures have been considered by the relevant specialist and have informed the design and specification of the catering facilities, but energy savings do not need to be quantified. At design stage it is acceptable for a letter or document to be produced confirming how each measure has been considered along with justification for how this has informed the specification. Where the measures require training to be carried out, relevant training materials could be used as evidence. At post-construction stage, any type of general evidence deemed appropriate by the assessor would be sufficient to confirm the specified measures have been installed.
25/08/2017 Updated to clarify compliance and evidence requirements.

NCM does not cover a building type - KBCN0686

If the NCM does not cover a building type or the Shell Only / Shell and Core project types, assessment using "Option 1 – Use of approved building energy calculation software" can still be used according to the guidance given in the technical manual. The generation of the notional building can be done by using the Appendix G Performance Rating Method of ASHRAE Energy Standard 90.1-2013 (for all buildings except low rise residential buildings) or ASHRAE Energy Standard 90.2-2007 (for low rise residential buildings). Any imperial units used in the standards are to be converted to metric first before they are used in any calculations. Prior to taking this approach the assessor should be satisfied that the NCM does not cover the assessed building type, and relevant evidence should be submitted to demonstrate this. For International 2013 assessments where ASHRAE Appendix G is used, regardless of the robustness of local regulations the correct Ene 01 translator curve used is "2. Good International Practice."

New build extension using existing lifts - KBCN0444

Where the assessment is only of a new build extension (and not the existing building), lifts present in the existing building fall outside the scope of Ene 06 and do not need to be assessed. The applies only when the lifts are not being renewed or undergoing a major refurbishment.

Night-time operation – requirement for controls - KBCN1048

Projects which operate at night-time can adapt or omit the requirement to provide controls or presence detection to align with the building’s hours of operation. The aim of this Issue is to reduce the energy use for external lighting and should not interfere with the building’s operation.

No unregulated energy consumption in the building - KBCN00066

Where there are no items, contributing to the unregulated (or equipment) energy consumption in the building, there is currently no mechanism to award credits. If, however, in this situation, significant contributors, not listed in the table, will be specified, the design team should justify how a meaningful reduction will be achieved for these contributors, in order to demonstrate compliance.
08/05/19 Wording amended to account for situations, where a meaningful reduction in unregulated energy can be demonstrated by other means.
18.05.2017 KBCN applicability removed for NC2011 and NC2013, for which compliance can be demonstrated via the three shell and core options, as per the technical manual.

Office equipment – mobile devices - KBCN00041

Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, which are generally used without connection to an electrical power source, should be excluded from the assessment of the energy efficient equipment issue. Devices which are not generally connected to an electrical power source when used are excluded from the 'office equipment' definition as they do not directly affect the unregulated energy consumption of the building.    

On-site LZC – whole site shared connection - KBCN1424

To be recognised in BREEAM, the on-site Low and Zero Carbon (LZC) technology must have a direct physical connection to the assessed building. OR Where the LZC technology is; it is acceptable to allocate the energy generated from this technology to the assessed building proportionally as a calculation of the building's predicted energy consumption compared to the total energy consumption of the whole site. To allocate renewable electricity by proportional consumption follow these steps; Where consumption data is missing, renewable electricity must not be allocated to the assessed building. In this case, it is assumed that all electricity consumed is sourced from the grid.

Only lifts in building are for persons with impaired mobility - KBCN1330

Where the only lifts, escalators or moving walkways in the assessed development are for persons with imparied mobility with speeds no greater than 0.15m/s, and there are no lifts which fall within the scope of the criteria, the Issue should be filtered out of the assessment. Credits cannot be awarded by default.

Parts of the building not subject to national thermal regulations - KBCN0534

Where you have parts of the assessed building which are not subject to national thermal regulations then these should be omitted from the EPR calculation.

Passive design analysis – Modelling the standard building when existing building elements are retained - KBCN1270

In circumstances where an existing building element (e.g. a facade) is being retained it is acceptable to incorporate them into the modelling of the 'standard building' baseline, for the purpose of undertaking passive design analysis. All other building elements should be modelled with fabric performance equivalent to that of the local Building Regulations Notional Building (or for Scotland, an equivalent compliant building) and without the passive design measures (where feasible i.e. building orientation is likely to be fixed).


Passive design analysis where Hea 04 is not applicable - KBCN1236

Where Hea 04 is not applicable to the building type and options selected (for example an industrial building with no office areas), criterion 1 of Ene 04 is not applicable.

Photovoltaics’ delivered energy - KBCN0841

The BREEAM best practice specification refers to 'on-site electrical generation'. This requires information on the delivered energy from photovoltaic panels, rather than the relevant primary energy. Please refer to GN25: BREEAM International New Construction 2016 Ene 01 Calculation Methodology for more information.

Point of use water heaters - KBCN0773

Small 'point of use' water heaters can be excluded from the sub-metering requirements. Only major energy consuming systems that have a measurable impact on the operational energy consumption need to be included.

Re-used electrical equipment - KBCN0325

BREEAM does not currently recognise the reuse of electrical equipment as the most energy efficient option for compliance with this issue. If it can be demonstrated that such existing electrical appliances meet the criteria for inclusion in the relevant national or international energy efficient equipment schemes, these can be considered compliant. If new equipment is procured in addition to the re-use of the old equipment, the existing equipment may be excluded from this assessment. In these situations the assessor must be satisfied that the new equipment would make a meaningful reduction to overall unregulated energy consumption. This issue assesses the reduction of unregulated energy consumption in operation and does not currently assess embodied energy in the manufacture of equipment.

Regenerative drives – requirement for specification - KBCN1253

Requirements for the specification of a regenerative drive for lift installations are subject to an analysis of resultant energy savings. However, where it can be demonstrated that this is not financially viable, accounting for payback over the service life of the installation, this option can be discounted. Please also refer to other scheme-specific guidance relating to this requirement.

RGB LED lighting - KBCN0986

RGB LED lighting must be assessed against the average external lighting efficacy benchmark. The current criteria do not completely rule out the use of RGB LED lighting as it can potentially be combined with other types of external lighting to meet the average efficacy benchmark.

Scope of energy efficient cold storage - KBCN00029

The scope of this issue covers freezer or cold storage rooms which are integral to the building. The criteria for this issue relate to the design, systems, components and operation of the cold store. These are, therefore, relevant and applicable where a cold store is designed specifically for the assessed development. "Kitchen and catering facilities" refers to commercial-sized, but self-contained, off-the-shelf units (e.g. large freezers or fridges) which are delivered and installed incorporating their own refrigeration systems. These are not assessed under this issue but may fall within the scope of the 'Energy efficient equipment' issue, where applicable.
02/06/17 Further clarified to convey the applicability of this Issue
02/12/16 Wording clarified - no change to approach.

Self-contained dwellings or units with individual utility meters - KBCN0199

Where self-contained dwellings or units covered by the assessment have their own individual energy supply and utility meter (e.g. water, gas or electricity), this supply can be excluded from the scope of the issue. All shared energy supplies and common areas under the responsibility of building management are still included in the assessment. For example, if self-contained flats in an assisted living development have individual gas supplies with their own utility meter, this supply will be excluded from the assessment. However, the lighting and small power comes from a shared distribution board on each floor, in which case this shared supply will need to be sub-metered in accordance with the criteria.
12/09/2018 Applicable to Water Monitoring Issue where appropriate
27/09/2017 The word 'units' added to include a wider range of scenarios falling under this principle.
 

Shell only – energy demand parameter not available - KBCN0576

In 2016 New Construction (NC) international scheme shell only assessment, energy demand is the required assessment metric for Ene 01. A lot of international assessments are unable to provide the energy demand performance information, and as such, this approach won’t always be possible. Where there is no demand parameter available, follow the same approach as outlined for ‘shell and core’.

Shell only – Installation of building services - KBCN00078

In shell only projects, even where installed system(s) will improve the primary consumption and/or CO2 EPR metrics, only the EPR demand metric should be used for the assessment of Ene 01. This ensures comparability and consistency between Shell Only assessments.

Shell only – retail glazing not within scope - KBCN0937

Where a retail building envelope is not complete and glazing will be provided by the future tenant/(s), there are two options available: A 'Green fit-out agreement' (see Definition under this Issue in the technical manual) can be used to ensure that the performance level of the glazing used in the energy model is met in the completed building. This must be accompanied by evidence that the performance of the assumed glazing does not impose overly onerous requirements on future tenants and that it falls within the scope of glazing typically used in retail developments. Alternatively, the assessment can be based on worst permissible performance under the relevant national building regulations. In all cases, for shell only assessments, the assessment method detailed in CN1 (for UK New Construction 2014 and International New Construction 2016) and Assessment type specific note 1.3 (for UK New Construction 2018) must be followed.
14 11 2017 Wording amended to clarify the intent

Single functional area and no tenanted areas – operational energy monitoring - KBCN00056

For a building with only a single functional area and no tenanted or additional functional areas to be sub-metered, both credits, where applicable to the building type, can be awarded if the first credit has been achieved.

Space heating as major energy use - KBCN0939

Where possible, space heating should always be considered as a major energy use for sub-metering purposes. Where space heating cannot be separated from hot water, this must be fully justified by the design team at QA. See KBCN0329: Combined system for space heating/cooling and domestic hot water. Where electric space heating is used, this in itself cannot be used as justification for combining the space heating along with lighting and small power unless there is a clear justification for doing so. See KBCN0068: Combined sub-metering of electric heating and small power equipment.

Sub-metering at least 90% of each fuel - KBCN0657

In a scenario whereby several energy consuming systems are not sub-metered because they account for less than 10% of the annual energy consumption (see Ene 02 methodology), and this results in less than 90% of the estimated annual energy consumption of that fuel being metered, the M&E consultant should review the metering strategy and advise which of these energy consuming systems would most benefit from sub-metering to make up the 90%. This may be based on which of the energy consuming systems has the highest annual energy consumption, or which has the most potential for reducing energy consumption as a result of sub-metering. This will not necessarily have to mean that the energy consuming systems chosen have to have their own sub-meter, the M&E consultant may decide they would most benefit from metering alongside another consuming system. However ultimately 90% of each fuel must be metered. Justification should be given within the metering strategy and the BREEAM assessment report as to which lower energy consuming systems were chosen to be sub-metered to make up the 90%, and how this was done to best suit the development (i.e. individual sub-meters or paired with another consuming system).

Sub-metering by calculation - KBCN0700

For simple sub-metering strategies, it is acceptable to calculate a single end-use by subtraction of known, sub-metered end-uses from the relevant main utility meter reading. For more complex strategies, where a BMS/BEMS is used, the software should be capable of calculating and displaying all required end-uses in line with the criteria.

Thermal modelling for shell only developments - KBCN0784

For shell only developments, in order to achieve criterion 1, thermal modelling can be completed on the basis of a typical notional layout and equipment specification for the particular building type (retail, restaurants, cinema etc.) can be used to demonstrate compliance.

Towel rails - KBCN00081

Towel rails cannot count towards the drying line requirements. Clothes drying lines are provided to reduce the need to tumble drying clothes, which uses a lot of energy. Using towel rails to dry clothes would require the potentially damp towels to be stored while the clothes dry. This is inconvenient and therefore means the aim of the credit is less likely to be met. 

Transportation analysis carried out by the lift manufacturer - KBCN0232

BREEAM recognises that lift manufacturers / suppliers are often engaged to provide such specialist advice. Where the assessor is satisfied that the analysis has been carried out correctly, the analysis can be submitted as compliant evidence.

[KBCN withdrawn] ~ Separate energy models for a single assessment - KBCN00011

This KBCN is now superseded. Please refer to KBCN0216
KBCN withdrawn. 
This KBCN is suspended, pending technical review. When undertaking a similar buildings assessment, compliance must be based on the worst-performing unit for Issue Ene 01 as stated below and in the technical manuals. The area-weighted approach may only be used where multiple buildings falling under the same building type, which require separate energy models are operating as a single entity with a single occupier, such as a school. For building types other than schools, should you consider there is justification to apply the area-weighted approach, please seek advice from BRE by submitting a technical query.

Superseded content:

Where the assessment is using the Similar Buildings approach as outlined in GN10, compliance under Ene 01 must be based on the worst performing unit. In the Assessment Scoring & Reporting (S&R) tool the value entered for building floor area can be the combined area of the buildings assessed rather than just the area of the worst case building, as this shouldn’t affect the calculation of the Ene 01 score.

In certain situations, a single assessment with multiple energy models may not follow the Similar Buildings approach as this would unreasonably impact the overall performance. An example of this could be a school assessment with a separate sports hall included in the same assessment.
 In these cases, the methodology below applies:
 1. For each energy model, input the notional and actual performance figures into the scoring and reporting tool to determine individual EPRs.
 2. Manually area-weight each individual EPR to calculate an area-weighted average EPR for the assessment.
 3. Use table 25 in the NC 2014 manual, Ene 01, to determine the number of credits awarded.
 We will provide an amended S&R tool which will have the relevant cell unlocked to allow the number of credits to be manually inputted. In terms of evidence for QA, we would require screenshots of the S&R EPR outputs for each building and a copy of the area weighting calculation.
 Please seek advice from the BRE if in doubt on which methodology applies to your project.
15/02/2018 KBCN Suspended and clarification note added pending review and publication of further guidance.
04/06/2018 KBCN No longer applicable. Reference to GN10 v1.0 added.
31/10/2018 Re-formatted for clarity and reference to GN10 removed from superseded content to avoid confusion.
 
Information correct as of 19thJune 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.