4 Operational /

Scheme Classifications

Information correct as of 5thMay 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.

Assessment of multi-phase projects - KBCN0432

Where a project will be designed and built in two or more phases, the following rule should be applied: If there is enough information on multiple phases to enable the design stage assessment to be carried out at the same time, it is possible to assess these phases at the design stage in one assessment. At this point you have a choice - either wait for those phases to be constructed before doing one post-construction assessment for the whole project, or do a post-construction stage assessment for each phase. Please note that if you do separate post-construction stage assessments (PCRs), this will require your original registration to be split into the number of phases. A new registration fee applies for any additional registrations, and an additional certification fee will also apply for any additional post-construction stage certificates.
18/10/2016: edited to remove the condition for overlapping phases

Healthcare: Part refurbishment/Part new build - KBCN0468

The guidance provided within the BREEAM Non-Domestic refurbishment and fit-out scheme should be used as the basis for determining which BREEAM scheme should be used for such developments. If after reviewing the BREEAM guidance, it is likely that multiple assessments will be required, we would advise that you discuss this further with the relevant Health Authority.

Office building on an education campus - KBCN0443

If an office situated on a higher or further education campus is used exclusively for administrative and support services with no educational function, it should be classified and assessed as an Office building.

Residential institutions – long and short term stay - KBCN0591

BREEAM does not define a distinction between short and long-term stay in terms of time. The distinction should be made on the basis of whether the residential institution can be considered as the occupant's main home for a period of time. So, if the occupant stays there for 1-2 months, for example, while on a business trip, this could be considered as short term. If these are let based on a tenancy of 6 months or more, however, this would be considered long-term.

Scheme classification – Crèche vs Nursery - KBCN1112

For the purposes of scheme classifications for BREEAM, a crèche is considered to be a drop-in facility which provides short-term child minding. These are often associated with other facilities, such as a shopping or sports centre. A nursery is considered as as a pre-school establishment, providing regular childcare and early years education. Given their differing functions, these are classified differently for BREEAM, as indicated within the Scope section of relevant BREEAM technical manuals.

Scheme classification – Education - KBCN0398

The Education scheme classification criteria is tailored to the requirements of buildings that are likely to be used by large numbers of students, whose requirements differ slightly from the general population. Where a building on an education campus, or owned by an educational institution: - is not used for teaching / study - is primarily used by staff or other non-students - and transport requirements differ from a standard Education building The building may be assessed under a different, more appropriate scheme classification. Where it is unclear how this building should be assessed, a scheme classification query should be submitted.  

Scheme classification based on anticipated occupancy & building use - KBCN0421

In the instance where there is potential for the building occupancy and use to change during the building lifetime, scheme classification should be based on the most likely occupancy and use of the building as anticipated at the time of the assessment. Please refer to Guidance Note 10 (GN10) for further details

Scheme classification for residential projects (UK) - KBCN1225

Choosing the right scheme for developments is the starting point to ensure successful outcomes and value, in terms of quality and sustainability to building owners and for occupants of the building. In light of the release of Home Quality Mark (HQM) ONE we have reviewed the existing guidance around scheme classifications of new build residential buildings and have removed ‘GN03 – Scheme Classification – Domestic buildings’ from BREEAM Projects. When GN03 was written, the Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH) did not fully consider communal areas within residential blocks as part of the assessment. CSH was also not applicable in Scotland. GN03 was developed to clarify the differences between BREEAM Multi-Residential, CSH and EcoHomes, and when each scheme should be applied. There is now a clearer distinction between BREEAM Multi-residential and HQM and when these should be used. Ultimately, the determining factor for a scheme classification is now focused on the intent of the building and who is going to be the end user (as opposed to previous guidance which considered aspects such as percentage of communal areas, etc.). Broadly, if the building’s main purpose is for long term homes then Home Quality Mark is the correct scheme to use. Please use the following as guidance to identify the most appropriate scheme: Home Quality Mark (HQM) HQM has been designed with the occupant in mind. It assesses homes individually, but can also account for common areas associated with blocks of self-contained homes. HQM outputs (rating and indicators e.g. ‘my cost’, ‘my wellbeing’ and ‘my footprint’) are specifically aimed at those living in the home and are designed to better inform the occupant about the benefits of the home that they are purchasing or renting. An HQM project will meet one or more of the following criteria: Be designed to meet the function of a long-term self-contained home even though there may be some provision of communal facilities which can be used on a voluntary basis Be classified under Building regulations Part L1a (i.e. required to complete SAP assessments, although there may be some linked SBEM assessed spaces associated with the project) As such, HQM projects could be homes for sale, social housing or homes for rent (PRS and Built to Rent). They may also include some student and retirement/sheltered accommodation where the units are comparable to a normal self-contained flat/home. BREEAM Multi-residential For the purposes of BREEAM Multi-residential assessments, the term ‘multi-residential’ is used in the context of buildings that contain rooms for residential purposes alongside communal facilities for catering, leisure, care etc. These residential rooms would normally not have the full, self-contained functions of a home. This scheme usually covers more specialist residential care homes, student halls of residence, and other more communal accommodation. The scheme can cater for a small number of self-contained dwellings where these form part of a larger multi-residential development (e.g. on-site warden homes etc.). Under this scheme, the project is assessed on a whole building basis and as such does not seek to reflect the performance of individual residential units/rooms. A BREEAM Multi-residential project will meet one or more of the following criteria: Be provided for transient /non-permanent occupants Provide suitable accommodation for occupants requiring support from carers, wardens or similar Include shared living spaces Be classified under Building regulations Part L2a (i.e. required to complete SBEM assessments, but can account for some SAP assessed spaces where associated with the project) As a rule of thumb, if the building contains rooms rather than self-contained flats or homes, a BREEAM Multi-residential assessment would probably be most appropriate. We are aware of some confusion over the meaning of the term ‘multi-residential’ in this context and will be considering the use of term as part of the next review of the BREEAM Multi-Residential scheme. If you are unsure of the appropriate scheme classification for a particular project, please contact the BREEAM office before registering the project.

Scheme classification queries - KBCN0540

As the Operational Guidance clarifies ‘…A scheme classification requires the assessor, client or design team to submit floor plans showing the layout of the building(s) along with its intended functional areas and any other relevant information. BRE Global will then confirm the appropriate means of assessing the development, using either one or more standard schemes or by developing project-specific bespoke criteria…’ BREEAM Technical cannot definitively confirm a scheme classification in the absence of drawings. Relevant information could also include specification of the scope of works, clarification of general building functions, spaces within them, as well as their management and access to the public.  

Scope: Fully fitted, shell and core and shell only – guidance for classification - KBCN0702

In cases where a project is a mix of fully-fitted, shell & core, or shell only, or the scope falls somewhere between assessment types, BREEAM cannot determine the type of assessment on behalf of the assessor/developer. For example, assessing a project which falls between (or is a mixture of) shell only and shell & core as 'shell only' will result in a BREEAM certificate for that part of the work and will not account for any work beyond the scope of that assessment type. For the same development a 'shell and core' assessment would take account of a wider scope of work, however some BREEAM credits might not be achievable because compliance cannot be demonstrated for the shell only areas. The latter approach would achieve a higher level of certification (as shell & core) but may result in a lower score and BREEAM rating being achieved. Similar considerations apply in the case of fully fitted and shell and core projects. The assessor should, therefore, review the scope of the development and advise the developer accordingly.

Simple Buildings – definition - KBCN0448

The building services are predominantly of limited capacity and local in their delivery, largely independent from other systems in the building fabric and avoid complex control systems. The building can be classified as any of the building types within the scope of the scheme, including mixed use developments or building types. For UK NC 2011 assessments please refer to the Simple Buildings Guidance on the Extranet. For UK NC 2014, 2018 and UK RFO 2014 please refer to Appendix E within each technical manual.

Simple Buildings – No size or cost limits - KBCN0451

Variations in project specification make setting limits on the size or the cost of simple buildings problematic. Therefore, no limits have been set.

UK NC2018 Update – Bespoke UK RFO/UK NC assessments - KBCN1079

Until the UK RFO scheme is updated to align with UK NC2018, 'Bespoke' NC/RFO assessments will continue to be registered against UK RFO2014 and apply the UK RFO2014 and UK NC2014 criteria.
Information correct as of 5thMay 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.