Refurbishment and Fit Out / UK / 2014 /

02 - Health and Wellbeing

Information correct as of 26thOctober 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.

2030s weather files - KBCN000006

The Exeter University Prometheus project contains future weather files which cover the 2030s. These can be found here: https://emps.exeter.ac.uk/engineering/research/cee/research/prometheus/downloads/
13 09 2017 Hyperlink to Prometheus project updated. Applicability to BREEAM International schemes removed - (see  KBCN0732)

Absence of regulated/prohibited wood preservatives - KBCN0740

Preservatives (pentachlorophenol or PCP which is a “regulated/prohibited substance”) must be absent. This is defined when verified by testing that the concentration is less than 5ppm, in which instance the chemical is regarded as ‘absent’.

Acoustic requirements for care homes - KBCN1241

In order to meet compliance against issue Hea 05, assessment against Part E is necessary, even if compliance with Approved Document E is not required by Building Control. The multi-residential criteria are intended to reflect that the building occupants are comfortable and have an appropriate level of privacy. Although these are exempt from building regulations for care homes, for a development assessed as multi-residential, the criteria relevant to multi-residential buildings must be applied.

Adhesives for rigid wall coverings - KBCN00076

Rigid wall covering adhesives need to meet the standard listed for flooring adhesives.
Published pending reissue of the technical manual UKNC2011/REISSUE UKNC2014/REISSUE UKRFO2014/REISSUE

AgBB – earlier versions of the standard - KBCN0655

Guidance Note GN22 lists the standard AgBB (2015) as a recognised scheme for emissions from building products for pre-December 2015 launched BREEAM schemes. Previous versions of the AgBB scheme are not listed as recognised schemes because earlier versions of AgBB did not include any requirement for the testing of Formaldehyde. If an earlier version AgBB has been used, further evidence will be required to provide additional information on the required Formaldehyde testing.

Air-conditioned spaces - KBCN00035

Air-conditioned spaces are assessed to ensure appropriate thermal comfort levels are achieved. Cooling capacity should be sufficient to comply with the requirements of CIBSE Guide A, however providing sufficient space to install additional capacity to meet the requirements at a later date in line with projected climate change scenarios is also acceptable. In addition, if it can be demonstrated that the air-conditioning system can achieve the thermal comfort criteria in accordance with CIBSE Guide A, Table 1.5, thermal modelling does not need to be carried out. The “time out of range” (TOR) metric should be reported as 0%.  

Alternative acoustic standards - KBCN0130

If alternative standards are deemed more appropriate to the function than those specified in the criteria, these can be used if confirmed and justified by the 'suitably qualified acoustician' and such written confirmation is submitted as supporting evidence for QA purposes.

Alternative weather files - KBCN1182

Different or newer weather files can be used instead of those referenced in the manual, as long as they achieve the aim of the credit. Weather files based on climate projections with higher temperatures than those specified in the relevant criteria, set a more robust standard for overheating and so they are acceptable. The alternative weather files need to include same variables as the specified weather files e.g. dry bulb & wet bulb temperature, wind speed & direction, solar altitude & azimuth, cloud cover etc. for each hour of the year. It is the role of the assessor or design team to verify this and ensure that meeting the BREEAM criteria does not become easier by using the alternative weather file.

ANC membership/registration scheme compliance route - KBCN0246

The Association of Noise Consultants (ANC) registration scheme is only applicable to buildings covered in Approved Document E. It therefore covers Dwellings-Houses, flats and rooms for residential purposes and schools, and so would only apply to assessments that contain these room types. For these assessments, if the suitably qualified accoustician is a member of the ANC, they must also provide evidence to demonstrate that they are a full member of the ANC registration scheme. For all other building/room types, assessors can still demonstrate compliance by the other routes listed in the manual.

Applying internal partition sound insulation criteria to internal doors - KBCN0665

Where sound insulation criteria apply to internal partitions the calculations do need to include any doors which are part of the wall in question. While sound insulation performance of a typical door will be lower than for a typical wall, with careful design, specification and detailing, this can be overcome. 

Applying the requirements to Shell & Core assessments - KBCN00075

A Suitably Qualified Acoustician (SQA) must carry out a quantifiable assessment of the specification of the built form, construction and any external factors that are likely to affect the indoor ambient noise levels. From this assessment, the SQA must confirm that the developer’s scope of works will enable a future tenant utilising a typical fit-out and specification to meet the levels required to demonstrate compliance with the BREEAM criteria. Where the specific room functions and areas within the building are yet to be defined, the acoustician’s assessment should demonstrate that the criteria for the most sensitive room type likely to be present in the building is capable of being achieved. Where the typical fit out would include a range of requirements (e.g. offices with a mix of open plan, cellular offices, meeting rooms and breakout areas; or retail with sales floor, stock/storage, office and staff rest areas), the acoustician should make an assessment based on a speculative layout and outline specification to determine whether the requirements of the relevant best practice standard are achievable and include examples of the most sensitive room types. Where the majority of a building’s floor plan will require high performance acoustic environments (e.g. classroom/seminar buildings), then the BREEAM requirements must be achieved for the entire shell where specific layouts are not determined by the built form. Post-construction testing is not required subject to confirmation from the project team that the built form, construction and any external factors have not changed from those used in the SQA's assessment.
09/08/2019 Confirmed applicability to UK NC 2018
08/12/2017 Clarification added regarding post-construction evidence.
   

Approach to thermal model when using BMS - KBCN0169

Where there are smart systems such as BMS in place, modelling must consider normal operating conditions, with the heating and cooling system in operation regardless of the control strategy. In order for the design team to size the heating/cooling plant, they will carry out modelling to calculate the heat/cold loss throughout the year. Results of these calculations must be submitted, with the heating/cooling plant specification which would demonstrate that the building has been designed to ensure internal winter/summer temperatures will not drop below an acceptable level, and that in effect the winter TOR is zero.  

Appropriate project stage to appoint a suitably qualified acoustician - KBCN0256

BREEAM requires that a suitably qualified acoustician is appointed at an appropriate stage of the project, so as to ensure that early design advice on criteria of pre-requisition is met. The aim is to ensure that costly amendments to building designs are not made as a result of late appointment of the acoustician. Ultimately, it is for the assessor to determine at what stage of the project is deemed to be appropriate for this appointment to have taken place given the project specific circumstances and procurement type.  

Areas assessed for formaldehyde and TVOC - KBCN1008

This KBCN is no longer applicable. Please refer to KBCN0871 for scope of 'Emission levels (products)' and 'Other information' section of the technical manual for scope of 'Emission levels (post-construction)'. Superseded text: Products applied or installed in parts of the building likely to affect the indoor air quality and impact the wellbeing of building users need to be assessed. Areas are not excluded on the basis of how long building users are present in those areas.
27/02/2018 - KBCN N/A due to ambiguity of applicability to criteria

Assessing industrial spaces – exemptions - KBCN0734

The thermal comfort criteria are not applicable to the operational or storage areas typically found in industrial buildings. The criteria should still be applied to the other parts of the building as appropriate. Operational and storage areas often have function related thermal requirements determined by the needs of the operation or the items being stored. These functional requirements supersede the needs of the occupants.
Technical manual to be updated accordingly in the next re-issue of each manual

03.11.2020 Issue 2.0 of UK RFO technical manual updated with new CN detailing the above.

Assessment with no external lighting - KBCN0441

If the scope of works does not include external lighting and it can be demonstrated that the building will not require external lighting once fitted-out and in operation, the external lighting requirements can be assumed to be met.
22/01/2018 KBCN wording amended to extend applicability to all types of assessments.

28/06/2018 Applicability to International New Construction 2016 and Refurbishment and Fit-Out 2015 removed.

Associate membership of the Institute of Acoustics - KBCN00064

Associate membership of the Institute of Acoustics (IOA) is not sufficient to demonstrate that the individual is a member of an appropriate professional body, to meet the requirements of a suitably qualified acoustician (SQA). The following is stated on the IOA website about Associate Membership; 'this class of membership is aimed primarily at persons who have obtained the appropriate academic qualifications for the grade of Member but who do not (yet) have the relevant period of experience in the profession for the grade of Member.'  
13/01/2020 Wording clarified and confirmed applicability to Issue Pol 05
06/01/2020 Clarification that this applies to BREEAM UK NC2018
 

Building Bulletin 101 - KBCN0786

Within Compliance Note CN4.1, reference is made to the appropriate industry standard for schools being Building Bulletin 101: Ventilation of school buildings (2014). This has been updated to BB101 2018, so either the current version or the specified 2014 standard may be used to demonstrate compliance. If the thermal modelling specialist recommends an alternative standard, for example TM52, then this would be acceptable provided there is a full justification.
11/08/2021 Updated to recognise the current version of the standard

Compliant test body - KBCN0821

This requirement applies to all acoustic tests that are carried out for the purpose of demonstrating compliance with this BREEAM issue. This is regardless of whether the Suitable Qualified Acoustician (SQA) will define a bespoke set of performance and testing requirements or whether the standard criteria performance and test requirements will be followed.
03.11.2021 The above has been added to the Methodology section in issue 2.0 of the UK RFO technical manual. The above is relevant to previous issues of the manual.

Compliant test body – alternative compliance route using a Suitably Qualified Acoustician - KBCN1412

Where acoustic testing and measurement has not been performed by an organisation or individual that meets the definition of a compliant test body, compliance with this requirement can still be demonstrated where a Suitably Qualified Acoustician has reviewed the relevant test report(s). The test report must: a) Be countersigned or authorised by a Suitably Qualified Acoustician b) Include a clear statement that the acoustic testing and measurements have been carried out in accordance with the BREEAM or HQM testing requirements AND c) Include evidence that the verifier meets the definition for a Suitably Qualified Acoustician within the relevant BREEAM or HQM technical manual

Daylight requirements for schools - KBCN1427

Schools can use the ‘Department for Education Output Specification Technical Annex 2E Daylight and Electric Lighting’ from the Department for Education’s Output Specification to achieve compliance. Where the daylighting requirements in this standard have been achieved for all relevant rooms within the building, it can be assumed that the BREEAM daylighting requirements for two credits have also been met and therefore two credits can be awarded. If 80% of all relevant room types (weighted by area) meet the daylighting requirements in the above document, then three credits can be awarded.

Daylighting – speculative building - KBCN0269

Where the building is speculative and therefore the final layout is not defined (e.g. only an open plan shell is provided in each tenanted space), the required percentage of each open plan shell should meet the daylighting requirements. However, where it is possible to designate separable ancillary areas that would be required in the space (such as toilets or server room), these can be excluded from the calculation. For daylight calculations in speculative projects where the layout and colours are unknown, a realistic notional layout may be used.

Daylighting – ‘Internal association or atrium areas’ - KBCN1267

This term refers to areas intended to replace outdoor recreation spaces, typically found in prisons, but which may also be present in hospitals and residential accommodation for elderly people. The requirements relating to such spaces are, therefore, not generally applicable to other building types.  

Daylighting – calculation procedures - KBCN1339

For all spaces in the building where daylight provision is relevant (these are defined in the defintions for the relevant building areas), calculate the area weighted percentage improvement in daylight (Σ Ai Pi) / (Σ Ai ). Here Ai is the floor area of space i and Pi is the percentage increase in daylight in it. The Σ operator means to sum over all the relevant spaces. In order to demonstrate compliance with criteria 4 and 5 for an improvement in existing daylighting, for each space, the percentage increase in daylight (Pi) is calculated in one of the following ways: Where only the window area or glass transmission will increase:
  1. If window area has increased but all other aspects remain the same, Pi = ((increase in glass area)/(original glass area)) x100%.
  2. If glass transmission has increased but all other aspects remain the same, Pi = ((increase in glass transmission)/(original glass transmission)) x100%.
Where many aspects will change (e.g. room size, a combination of reflectance and window size etc.):
  1. Calculate the average daylight factor (ADF) in the space ‘before’ and ‘after’. Pi =( (ADF after – ADF before)/ ADF before) x100%.
  2. Calculate the average illuminance in the space that is exceeded for 2000 hours per year. Pi =( (Average illuminance after – Average illuminance before)/ Average illuminance before) x100%.
This will be amended in the next version of the manual.

Daylighting – Changing rooms - KBCN1132

The daylighting criteria are not applicable to changing rooms.

Daylighting – communal kitchens (multi-residential) - KBCN0217

Communal kitchens should be assessed under 'Non-residential / Communal Occupied Spaces. Communal kitchens outside of self-contained dwelling units, for example a kitchen within a self-contained student flat shared between several students would be classed as a private kitchen for the purposes of this issue. However, if it was shared between rooms along a communal corridor it would be considered a communal kitchen, and assessed under 'Non-residential buildings - occupied spaces'.

Daylighting – Floor areas for average daylight calculations - KBCN0471

Where the room size is comparable and the function is the same, such as ‘kitchen’, the percentage rule needs to be applied to the total floor area. As the average daylight factor is a measure of daylight across the whole room, only whole rooms can be compliant. This is why we refer to rounding up the ‘80% of the floor area’ requirement to the rounded-up number of compliant rooms. This rule applies to rooms of a similar size and function and compliance note ‘percentage of assessed area’ includes a simple example, where all the rooms are the same size. However, this rule can still be applied to rooms of different sizes. Spaces whose size is substantially larger should meet the average daylight factor requirement on their own. In these cases, the percentage requirement is still applicable to the floor area of the remaining rooms. For example, where 80% of ‘teaching, lecture and seminar spaces’ need to comply with the average daylight factor, if we have a large lecture theatre of 200m2 and 3 seminar spaces of 30m2 each, the requirements for 80% would mean 232m2 of the floor area need to comply. This would require the lecture theatre and two seminar spaces to comply. Where a building contains different area types, the 80% minimum floor area must be calculated by each separate building area type as defined in the table listing the average daylight factors required. For example, a multi-residential building that contains kitchen areas and living room areas, would need each one of these areas to comply with the 80% minimum floor area requirement separately. In schemes where dwellings are assessed separately, this is likely to result in 100% of the relevant dwelling areas complying. This is because in a typical house with one kitchen and one living room, an 80% requirement for the kitchen and an 80% requirement for the living room, would mean the whole kitchen and the whole living room need to comply (since only whole rooms can be compliant).
08/01/2021

Clarifications and example added.

Daylighting – Healthcare Buildings – Table 14 – Error - KBCN1125

Table 14 contains an error in the requirement for Healthcare buildings. The minimum daylight illuminance at worst lit point for "Occupied patients' areas (dayrooms, wards) and consulting rooms" should read, "At least 90 lux for 2650 hours per year or more".
The technical manual will be amended in the next re-issue.

Daylighting – requirements differing by area - KBCN0176

Where areas within a building have different daylighting requirements for the same credit, all relevant areas must meet the requirements to award the daylighting credit(s). The aim is to improve daylight conditions in all applicable area types of an assessed building.

Daylighting – retail cafe / dining areas - KBCN0968

Customer seating/dining areas in a cafe or restaurant should be considered as 'sales areas'. Sales counters, staff areas or food preparation areas, for example, should be assessed as 'Other occupied areas' in accordance with the definition of 'Occupied space'.. The requirements for 'Sales areas' are applied to transient spaces.  

Daylighting – studio flats - KBCN0808

In the case of studio flats, the minimum area of compliance for the average daylight factor requirement is based on the combined area of kitchen, living room, bed and study area. Circulation areas do not need to be included in the calculation.

Daylighting – uniformity ratio applicability - KBCN0584

The uniformity ratio requirements apply to the percentage of the building’s relevant areas specified in the table. In the NC 2013 scheme, this is 80%.

Daylighting uniformity criteria – Multi-residential/Residential institutions - KBCN1129

The view of sky criteria (Table 11 (b)) are applicable to Multi-residential/Residential institutions where the room depth criterion (Table 11 (c)) is used.
Other requirements for Multi-residential/Residential institutions in the Daylighting table should read 'Either (a) OR [(b) and (c)]'
11/02/2019  

Removed applicability to 2018 as this has been corrected in the latest version of the manual

Definition of concourse - KBCN0386

A concourse is an open area within or in front of a public building which is used primarily for circulation, short term waiting, or incidental interaction, analogous to the concourse of a train station. It should not be considered occupied space.  

Designing out crime officer (DOCO) - KBCN000005

As stated in the ‘Secured by Design (SBD) New Homes 2014 Application and Checklist’ form, the Crime Prevention Design Adviser (CPDA) or Architectural Liaison Officer (ALO) has been renamed to Designing Out Crime Officer (DOCO) therefore correspondence or a copy of the report/feedback from the DOCO is acceptable as evidence for this issue.

Erratum – Table 1 in V2.5 of GN22: BREEAM and HQM recognised schemes for emissions from construction products - KBCN1436

Table 1 in V2.5 of GN22 has two footnote symbols missing: • Product Type column – Paints and varnishes should read Paints and varnishes* • Product Type column – Wood panels should read Wood panels^
These will be corrected in the next reissue of the Note.

Exemplary level criteria – formaldehyde requirements applicability - KBCN1124

The exemplary level criteria for formaldehyde emission levels are not applicable to the following product types: A paints and varnishes G flooring adhesives H wall coverings Formaldehyde emission levels should be assessed on all other product types. This applies also to any approved alternative VOC schemes for these product types listed in GN22.

External lighting – architectural façade lighting - KBCN0650

Architectural façade (or other decorative) lighting, which does not provide users with lighting to perform tasks outdoors, does not need to be included in the assessment of external lighting. This Issue seeks to ensure that lighting levels are appropriate for tasks which building users will be undertaking outdoors.

External lighting – High frequency ballasts - KBCN0278

The requirement for all fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps to be fitted with high frequency ballasts does not apply to external lighting.  

Fabric specified for wall coverings - KBCN0724

For assessment of Volatile Organic Compound emissions levels (products), any fabric specified as part of a wall covering should be assessed as part of the wall covering.  It should not be assessed as part of the 'resilient textile and laminated floor coverings'.

Flexibility of acoustic requirements for naturally ventilated buildings - KBCN0219

When the Design Capability Supply Rate of 8 l/s per person is provided by natural ventilation, the design can achieve the BB93 performance standards for the indoor ambient noise levels in Table 1.1 of BB93 then the requirements can be increased by 5 dB LAeq,30min. This approach can be followed where BB93 is applicable.

Formaldehyde / VOC levels exceed prescribed limits - KBCN0258

If the measured formaldehyde / VOC concentrations were above the prescribed limits, the appropriate remedial action must be taken, as described in the IAQ Plan. The criterion requires confirmation of 'the measures that have or will be undertaken' however it does not specifically address re-testing. We would expect, however that the IAQ Plan should outline what remedial measures are appropriate depending upon the severity and type of the non-compliance with prescribed limits. Such measures may include re-testing as a matter of 'best practice'. Where levels are found to exceed these limits, the project team confirms the measures that have, or will be undertaken in accordance with the IAQ plan, to reduce the TVOC and formaldehyde levels to within the above limits.

Glare control – adjacent buildings - KBCN1211

It is acceptable to account for surrounding buildings, structures or other permanent environmental features when using simulation modelling to assess the risk of glare, provided this accounts for both direct sunlight and reflected glare from glazing or reflective surfaces.

Glare control – blackout blinds - KBCN0447

Blackout blinds can be used to meet the glare control requirements. Where the criteria set an upper limit for transmittance value, but no lower limit, blackout blinds will meet this requirement.

Glare Control – no relevant areas - KBCN0429

If the scope of the assessment does not include any relevant building areas, as defined within the manual, the criteria for Glare Control can be considered as met by default. Only spaces that fall within the definition of relevant areas and are within the assessment's scope need to be assessed.  
22/06/17 Wording clarified
16/06/17 KBCN amended to exclude content of KBCN0146.

Glare control – no windows in relevant areas - KBCN0146

Where a ‘relevant area’ as defined in the manual does not include any windows, the glare control criteria can considered as met for this area. Note that the view out and daylight criteria would not be achieved in rooms with no windows. Where there are no windows in a room there would be no potential for disabling glare, so the aim of the credit would be achieved.

Glare control – residential institution and multi-residential bedrooms - KBCN0666

Assuming that occupants are generally elsewhere during daylight hours, lighting and resultant glare are not considered to be problematic for bedrooms in residential institution and multi-residential assessments. The only exception to this is where designated additional office working space is provided. In these circumstances it is the role of the assessor to determine if individual spaces should be determined as 'relevant building areas' in accordance with guidance provided. Glare control criteria apply to building areas where lighting and resultant glare could be problematic for users.

Glare control – transmittance value - KBCN0709

Transmittance values should be based on those quoted for 'visible light' or 'optical transmittance'.
10 Mar 2021 Reference to 'optical transmittance' added for clarity

Glare control – use of tinted windows - KBCN0862

Solar control or 'tinted' glazing could potentially support the attainment of this requirement. However, the assessor must be satisfied and provide evidence to demonstrate that the particular glazing type, when used on the assessed building for a given location, is meeting this overarching aim of preventing disabling glare. It should be noted that whilst certain types of glazing, such as low emissivity glazing, may be slightly tinted, they may not necessarily be effective in reducing disabling glare. For facades receiving direct sunlight, tinted windows alone are unlikely to be sufficient in the majority of situations.

Glare control for roof lights - KBCN0319

Where roof lights are present, they must be considered when demonstrating that the glare control strategy provides adequate control/measures for minimising glare in that space. All sources of glare need to be considered when designing out the potential for disabling glare.

Glare control in Part 1 assessments - KBCN0100

Although the current technical manual indicates that forms of glare control are applicable to Part1 assessments, this has been reviewed and the BREEAM Projects template now allows the credit to be filtered out for such projects. This is in line with the NC 2014 scheme and takes account of 'occupant controlled devices' not being within scope.
28.5.21 Issue 2.0 of the UK RFO technical manual has been updated to address this.  International RFO 2016 technical manual to be updated accordingly in next reissue.
 

Glare control in residential areas - KBCN00040

Glare control criteria apply to building areas such as study bedrooms or facility management offices, where work or study will be carried out and where glare would hinder such activities. It does not apply to other residential areas.  

GN22 – Scheme version applicability - KBCN0646

Table 1 is for the use of any version of a scheme where the first version was released pre-December 2015, and table 2 is for the use of any version of a scheme where the first version was released post-November 2015.

GN22 Recognised schemes for emissions from building product - KBCN0719

Within the Health and Wellbeing category of a number of BREEAM schemes, credits are awarded for specifying materials that minimise emissions from building products, e.g. formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These criteria involve meeting emission level performance requirements in accordance with compliant performance and testing standards. Similar criteria have been included in the Home Quality Mark (HQM) scheme. The purpose of this Guidance Note is to publish a list of schemes that show equivalent or better performance than the current BREEAM and HQM criteria, and therefore can be used to demonstrate compliance with the criteria. This note should be read in conjunction with the relevant assessment issue guidance provided in the appropriate BREEAM scheme or HQM technical manual. View full Guidance Note (licensed assessors only) View all Guidance Notes (licensed assessors only)
12/03/2018 Link to Guidance Note updated
25/01/2019 Link to Guidance Note updated

High frequency ballasts - KBCN0284

Fluorescent and compact fluorescent lamps are the only types of lighting where high frequency ballasts are required. The requirement does not apply to any other type of lamps.

Indoor air quality plan - KBCN0294

The Indoor Air Quality Plan does not have prescriptive criteria as it is recognised that each building will have differing conditions/user requirements. There is flexibility for the design team to use their professional judgement to determine what is appropriate to meet the criterion, subject to the plan addressing the relevant items as listed within the Technical Manual.

Industrial buildings – operational areas - KBCN1342

The aim of this issue is to encourage a healthy internal environment.  For the operational areas of industrial buildings, the internal environment is dictated by health and safety requirements.  This means that the BREEAM requirements should not be made applicable to them, and so the operational areas can be ignored in the assessment of Hea 02.

Internal lighting – reference to CIBSE Lighting Guide 7 - KBCN1161

The references given in the technical manual are out of date. When assessing the internal lighting in areas where computer screens are regularly used, the sections of the CIBSE standard to refer to are: 2.4, 2.20, and 6.10 to 6.20.
To be amended in the next re-issue of the technical manual.

Laboratory containment levels - KBCN0903

BRE does not designate or define containment levels for laboratories. These are industry standard definitions. This research should be carried out by the assessor or an appropriate member of the design team. A good starting point would be HSE/COSHH or DEFRA depending upon the hazard type.

Late appointment of SQSC/SQSS - KBCN0339

Provided the appropriate security specialist confirms that the implementation of security measures has not been restricted due to the later stage at which their involvement was sought,  i.e. everything that would have been recommended can be still be implemented, then the credits can still be awarded (provided all other compliance requirements met). Considering the security requirements at an early stage of a project should ensure that the fully range of security options is still available to the project, leading to the best solution. If advice is sought later but this does not restrict the options available, then the intent of the issue can still be met. 

MoD or other secure government sites – Security criteria - KBCN0785

The MoD/other security procedures may take precedence in dealing with security risk and therefore the Secured by Design criteria under which this issue is assessed may not be appropriate. However, BREEAM will require that a Suitably Qualified Security Specialist/Consultant (SQSS/C), such as the MoD security consultant, should be consulted during or prior to the concept design stage or equivalent, and the final design must embody the recommendations / solutions of the MoD security consultant, in line with the security criteria.  

Natural Ventilation Heat Recovery Units - KBCN1126

Natural Ventilation Heat Recovery Units (NVHR) systems can be used to support a natural ventilation strategy where it can be demonstrated that openable windows provide sufficient fresh air to the building for the significant majority of the time that the space is occupied. The assessor will need to use their professional judgement to determine a 'significant majority of time' and be able to justify this within the assessment report.

No acoustically sensitive areas or rooms used for speech - KBCN0660

If written confirmation is provided by the Suitably Qualified Acoustician that there are no acoustically sensitive rooms or rooms used for speech (as defined in the technical guidance), the credits can only be awarded based on achieving all the remaining, applicable credit(s). Where compliance with criteria for this Issue cannot be demonstrated due to the nature of the development, the credits are not awarded by default, but by demonstrating that the acoustic performance has been addressed by meeting the available criteria.
16/12/16 - Clarification added for situations where there are no acoustically sensitive rooms and/or rooms used for speech.

Occupant control – BMS and degree of control - KBCN0175

A Building Management System controlled set point with local override controls limited to a set range would satisfy the occupant control requirement so long as the temperature range available to building users is confirmed as appropriate for the building type and user profile.

Occupant control – spaces requiring user controls - KBCN0170

The following guidance is intended to clarify the types of area for which user controls are required or would be considered beneficial. Please refer to the specific requirements of the applicable BREEAM Scheme to interpret this guidance appropriately. User controls which allow independent adjustment of heating/cooling systems within the building are required/considered beneficial in the following areas: User controls which allow independent adjustment of heating/cooling systems within the building are not required in the following areas: Please note that zoning is required in all areas of the building where specified in the assessment criteria for this issue.   User controls are required/considered beneficial in spaces which are owned, shared or temporarily owned by individual building occupants. User controls are not required in occasionally visited spaces or spaces where individual occupants are not expected to have control over the thermal conditions. 

Off-site manufactured installations – internal finishes - KBCN0137

Internal finishes in off-site manufactured installations such as lifts need to be assessed for the VOC criteria. The specification of internal finishes (regardless of whether they are installed on site or in the factory) will impact on VOC emissions. By specifying low VOC finishes, design teams will be encouraging manufacturers to consider the environmental impacts of their products.  

Office areas in education buildings – Relevant ventilation standard - KBCN0223

All education buildings should comply with BB101 Ventilation of school buildings, which confirms a ventilation rate for offices.  

Paints for specialist applications - KBCN0872

Where a paint or coating does not fall within one of the categories in Annex II of the EU Directive 2004/42/CE or the categories in the relevant tables of the technical manuals (for schemes where the Directive is not applicable), then the paint or coating does not need to be assessed.
16/06/2017 KBCN extracted from existing KBCN0212.
13/03/2020 KBCN amended to clarify exceptions and applicability

Part 2 Assessments & Thermal Zoning - KBCN0460

Some criteria related to thermal zoning and controls may not be applicable to Part 2 assessments. These should, however, be addressed as far as possible within the work to the core services and associated infrastructure, given the scope of works. Where compliance with any requirement is not possible, this should be justified by the design team in the evidence for this Issue.
03.11.2020 Amendment made to issue 2.0 of UK RFO technical manual to include the above in a Compliance Note. This KBCN is relevant to previous issues of the manual.

10/02/2017 - This replaces the previous CN which stated, incorrectly, that the criteria relating to thermal zoning do not apply to Part 2 assessments. This approach now aligns with the BREEAM manual and the scoring & reporting tool.

Part 4 first fit-out assessment - KBCN0945

For a Part 4 assessment of a first fit-out to a shell & core development, where access controls and security features are already in place, compliance can be demonstrated where the suitability of existing security is reviewed and any adaptations that may be required are implemented. The SQSS who carries out the review must meet the requirements set in the manual.

Performance requirements to be met by finished product - KBCN0212

Decorative paints and varnishes that occupants are exposed to should be assessed. This is likely to include paints applied to walls, ceilings, floors, doors, etc. It should be noted where finishes are applied to the product within the factory, these would be assessed as part of the whole product rather than as decorative paints and varnishes. The product as a whole must meet the requirements, for example if a wood panel has a finish applied to it in the factory, the whole product, i.e. all elements that make up that product, including the finish, would need comply with the requirements set for wood panel products in the issue. The finished product as a whole must meet the performance requirements/emission limits stipulated in the relevant BREEAM technical manual.
16/06/2017 Title and general principle amended to extend the applicability of the KBCN to all finishes. Paints specified for specialist applications covered in KBCN0872.
 

PMV and PPD reporting for mixed mode ventilation buildings - KBCN0632

When assessing buildings where both naturally ventilated and air conditioned spaces are included, reporting the PMV and PPD indices is required.

Potential for natural ventilation – areas exempted - KBCN0806

For projects where the majority of a building's occupied spaces will meet the criteria to achieve the potential for natural ventilation credit, but a relatively small area will not comply due to functional requirements of the space, (e.g. a lecture theatre), the credit can be awarded where this approach can be justified. The intention is to encourage the design of buildings where a strategy of (potential for) natural ventilation has been implemented as far as practically possible, given functional constraints. 

Potential for natural ventilation – retail assessments - KBCN00074

For industrial and retail buildings the 'potential for natural ventilation' requirements apply only to office areas. If a retail building does not contain any office areas, compliance is met by default. Whilst the requirements apply to permanently or semi-permanently occupied offices, small admin areas, which are used only occasionally, can be excluded. This also applies to shell only and shell and core projects, where it can be demonstrated that no office spaces will be provided, as part of the fit-out.
15/09/17 IRFO scheme applicability removed - please refer to KBCN0531.
19/10/2016 Clarification note added in relation to shell only and shell and core projects.
25/10/2016 Distinction between offices and small admin areas added.
 

Potential for natural ventilation – shell only assessments - KBCN0408

Where compliance depends on a speculative layout which is unknown, it is the responsibility of the design team to demonstrate that it is feasible for a future tenant to achieve compliance in the relevant areas via the use of a notional layout. This ensures that the shell allows the potential for compliance, and if this can be demonstrated the credit may be awarded.  

Potential for natural ventilation – use of doors to comply - KBCN0690

External doors cannot generally be considered for the natural ventilation strategy, due to issues of controllability of ventilation.  However, where the assessor believes and can robustly justify that the requirement for 'levels of ventilation’, referenced below, are met and that the use of the door for natural ventilation purposes would not create accessibility and/or security issues in the day-to-day use of the building, this may be acceptable. The two levels of ventilation must be able to achieve the following: • Higher level: higher rates of ventilation achievable to remove short term odours and/or prevent summertime overheating • Lower level: adequate levels of draught-free fresh air to meet the need for good indoor air quality throughout the year, sufficient for the occupancy load and the internal pollution loads of the space.  

Products tested to BS EN ISO 12460-5 standard - KBCN0118

Products tested to the BS EN ISO 12460-5 standard can be used to demonstrate compliance for the BREEAM VOC criteria, but only for wood panels and suspended ceiling tiles made from unfaced particle board, unfaced OSB or unfaced MDF. In such cases, factory production control testing must demonstrate that the product has a formaldehyde content of ≤ 8mg/100g oven dry board.
01/12/2017 Previously referenced standard EN 120 superceded by BS EN ISO 12460-5 Wood-based panels. Determination of formaldehyde release. Extraction method.

Projected climate change environment - KBCN1130

The building design should be evaluated against the projected climate change environment using the DSY weather file for the 50th percentile in: Free Running Buildings Mechanically Ventilated or Mixed Mode Buildings The emissions scenarios are a minimum which can be exceeded should the design team feel that consideration of building occupant risk/sensitivity to overheating is necessary.
03.11.2021 The above has been added to issue 2.0 of UK RFO technical manual. This KBCN is relevant to previous versions of the manual.

Projected climate change weather file - KBCN0117

Although other scenarios are available, for the thermal simulation of climate change environments, the 50th percentile weather file should be used for consistency with other assessments.
03.11.2020 Amendment made to include this information in issue 2.0 of UK RFO 2014 technical manual, but this KBCN is applicable to all issues of the technical manual.

Remedial works – timing of acoustic re-testing - KBCN1164

The intent of CN "Remedial works" is that, where these are required, re-testing is carried out prior to handover and occupation. However, it is permissible to carry out the re-testing post-occupation. This is provided any specific guidance for particular building types related test conditions have been met (for instance, it may be that some building specific guidance requires furniture or carpets to not be present during the testing). Compliance cannot be achieved based on a letter from the SQA confirming that the contractor has followed their advice to achieve the required performance.
07.11.18 KBCN amended to allow for re-testing to be carried-out post-handover.

Reporting PPD and PMV Figures - KBCN0867

The individual carrying out the modelling should be able to provide values for both the PMV and PPD for the building. The PMV and PPD values need to be reported, in the scoring & reporting tool, for data recording purposes. The values to report are the observed range of values for PMV and PPD across all occupied areas across all the hours when these are expected to be occupied (enter the minimum and maximum for each i.e. PMV = 0.2 - 0.5, PPD = 10 - 15%). However, if compliance with the thermal comfort criteria is demonstrated without using a full dynamic thermal analysis software package and via a less complex system, which does not generate the required PMV/PPD metrics, these do not have to be provided.

Scope of product assessment for VOCs - KBCN0871

For the purpose of this Issue, this covers any product installed or applied inside of the inner surface of the building’s infiltration, vapour or waterproof membrane or, where not present, inside of the inner surface of the building envelope’s interior facing thermal insulation layer. Only products that are installed or applied in parts of the building where their emissions are likely to affect indoor air quality need to be assessed.

Secured by Design certificate - KBCN0772

The Secured by Design (SBD) consultation process, when undertaken in-line with the BREEAM criteria, may provide an appropriate framework for demonstrating compliance, however achieving SBD certification is not a specific requirement of BREEAM.
27/02/17 Amended to clarify that SBD framework may comply but BREEAM criteria must be met

Security needs assessment (SNA) – Formal consultation with relevant stakeholders - KBCN1470

Providing the SQSS can provide evidence of reasonable attempts to obtain feedback from relevant stakeholders, this aspect of the SNA requirements will be satisfied. In the event that a relevant stakeholder does not provide a response when consulted (e.g. if they do not respond following a reasonable period, or they confirm that are unable to deal with the enquiry), it would be expected that SQSS consider alternative sources of information. For example, the SQSS may decide to refer to freely-available crime data on the Police UK website, and include a summary or analysis of this in their SNA.
13 Sep 2021 Applicability to HQM confirmed

Simple buildings - KBCN0970

This Issue is not applicable to simple buildings assessments and is therefore filtered out from the tool for these types of projects.
03.11.2021 Issue 2.0 of the UK RFO 2014 technical manual has been updated. The above is relevant to all previous issues of the manual.

Thermal comfort – Changing rooms - KBCN1133

Whilst thermal comfort in changing rooms may be considered as significant, such spaces are, generally, outside the scope of this Issue, as they would not fall within the definition of an 'occupied space'.
17/06/2019 - This supersedes the advice previously provided in this KBCN, which was published in error on 13/06/2018

Thermal modelling – naturally ventilated buildings with heating for the winter months - KBCN1345

Where naturally ventilated occupied spaces are heated in the winter/heating season, as an alternative to demonstrating compliance with the winter operative temperature ranges in CIBSE Guide A or other appropriate industry standard, such occupied spaces can demonstrate compliance through meeting the Category B requirements for PPD, PMV and local discomfort set out in Table A.1 of Annex A of ISO 7730:2005. Where this alternative compliance route is used, when these naturally ventilated occupied spaces are in ‘free-running mode’ (i.e. outside of the winter/heating season), it is not possible to use the ISO 7730:2005 method and therefore these spaces must demonstrate compliance with the requirements to limit the risk overheating in accordance with CIBSE TM52.

Thermal modelling for large scale projects - KBCN1171

In cases where the scale of the project makes it unfeasible to provide thermal modelling for every space, it is acceptable to demonstrate compliance with a representative sample of floors or rooms, ensuring any worst case scenarios are included.

Thermal modelling for Part 1 assessments - KBCN0944

Where a Shell Only (Part 1) assessment is being carried out, but the future servicing strategy is unknown, the thermal comfort credit is still applicable. To assess compliance, the upgraded shell of the building shall be modelled with a typical servicing configuration which meets as a minimum: The thermal modelling credit can be awarded when the notional modelled system achieves the BREEAM thermal comfort criteria. The intent is to ensure that thermal comfort is achievable with the proposed upgraded shell for any future occupiers. The details of the notional system could be passed on to future occupiers or servicing specialists to inform their servicing strategy.
03.11.2021 Amendments made to CN1 in issue 2.0 of UK RFO technical manual detailing the above.

Thermal modelling – buildings with mixed-mode ventilation - KBCN1346

Where a building has some occupied spaces that are naturally ventilated and some occupied spaces that are air-conditioned, the thermal modelling must demonstrate that the naturally ventilated spaces meet the criteria for naturally ventilated buildings and that the air-conditioned spaces meet the criteria for air-conditioned buildings.

Third party licensing or registration scheme - KBCN0902

A specialist registered with a BREEAM recognised third party licensing or registration scheme for security specialists can be considered a Suitably Qualified Security Specialist for the purposes of compliance with BREEAM Hea 06. The following are currently recognised as a third party licensing or registration scheme for an SQSS; • SABRE Registered Professional Only SABRE Registered Professionals holding the designation ‘SQSS’ are recognised. A live list of SABRE Registered Professionals and their designations can be found on www.redbooklive.com. Further information regarding the SABRE Registered Professional can be found on the SABRE website (www.bregroup.com/sabre).
(21/03/2018) Updated to include applicability to BREEAM UK NC 2011
(19/07/2018) Updated to clarify recognition of SABRE
(03/11/2021) Issue 2.0 of the UK RFO technical manual has be amended to include this information. The information is still relevant to previous versions of the manual.

Ventilation – Withdrawal of EN 13779:2007 - KBCN1054

Standard EN 13779:2007 has been withdrawn (01/02/2018) and in its place the following should be used: Non-residential buildings: Both standards provide three methods for selecting design ventilation rates: Dwellings (only applicable to the BREEAM International New Construction scheme): Both standards provide different options for selecting design ventilation rates: It is the design team’s responsibility to determine and apply the most appropriate method or option(s) for the project undergoing assessment. Existing projects can continue to use EN 13779:2007 where applicable. Any new assessment registrations should use the replacements above.
2019.09.01 - KBCN updated to reference new standard
2020.01.10 - KBCN updated to clarify methods for complying with new standards
2010.05.03 - Typo corrected to clarify that 'EN 16798-1:2019 Annex B.3 'either Category I OR Category II default design values' are to be used

Ventilation credit for Part 1 assessments - KBCN0974

The Ventilation credit is applicable to Part 1 assessments because there may be instances where the decisions made for the fabric and structure can have an impact on the ventilation strategy. For example, if a natural ventilation strategy is to be used, the criteria related to ventilation standards and the distance between openable windows and sources of external pollution would be relevant.  

View out – applicable areas - KBCN0268

The aim of the View out credit is to allow occupants to refocus their eyes from close work. The view out criteria are not applicable to occupied areas such as meeting rooms, where typically close work is not undertaken and there are no permanent workstations. Where rooms contain areas of different functions, only those areas that are applicable should be included in the assessment. In this case a notional line can be drawn on the plans and calculations made based on these applicable areas only.

View out – eye level - KBCN0581

BREEAM defines an adequate view out as being at seated eye level (1.2 – 1.3m) within the relevant building areas. However, where occupants will not have the option to be seated, for example in some industrial operational areas where the work being undertaken requires occupants to remain standing, the height of the view out can be changed accordingly to suit the eye level of occupants. All other view out requirements have to be met and clear justification provided for changing the height/level of the view out. In some relevant building areas, occupants may not be sitting down to undertake tasks. Allowing the view out height requirements to be changed accordingly ensures building occupants gain maximum benefit from the view out.   

View Out – First Aid Rooms - KBCN1104

The view out criteria do not apply to dedicated first aid or medical rooms in non-healthcare projects. BREEAM recognises the need for user privacy in such areas and that these are intermittently occupied.

View out – internal view within an atrium - KBCN1240

Where the criteria are otherwise met, an internal view across an unobstructed atrium void can be considered compliant. Internal views are generally not acceptable, however where it is physically impossible to obstruct the view with partitions, equipment or furniture, this can be accepted at the discretion of the assessor.

View out – no relevant areas - KBCN0876

If the scope of the assessment does not include any relevant building areas, as defined within the manual, the criteria for 'view out' can be considered as met by default. Only spaces that fall within the definition of relevant areas and are within the assessment's scope need to be assessed.

View out – percentage area - KBCN0166

For the view out credit, compliance must be demonstrated for the percentage of the floor area in each relevant building area, rather than the percentage of the total relevant building area in the building.
14/2/17 Wording amended to clarify that the percentage must be achieved for each 'relevant building area'.

View out – rooms used for security or other critical functions - KBCN1040

The View out criteria are not applicable to rooms containing security or critical systems or sensitive material, such as CCTV monitoring rooms. Where it can be demonstrated that the presence of compliant windows would compromise a critical function of the space, the criteria can be considered not applicable.

View out for commercial kitchens - KBCN1216

It is not necessary to provide a view out for commercial kitchens. This is because in such a space it is likely that kitchen staff will move around, doing various tasks. This makes the requirements for the view out to rest the eyes unnecessary.

Visual audit of site and surroundings - KBCN0685

The method of conducting the visual audit of the site and its surroundings required for a Security Needs Assessment (SNA) is at the discretion of the Suitably Qualified Security Specialist (SQSS). It can be carried out as a site visit, or through the review of relevant project information and drawings, provided the SQSS is satisfied that these are sufficient to inform their SNA & associated security recommendations. The approach should be justifiable in terms of the scale, complexity, location and any other specific aspects of the assessed development.

VOC content – manufacturers’ calculations - KBCN0452

Manufacturers' calculations of VOC content, based on the constituent ingredients, can be used to demonstrate compliance with the testing requirement for paints and varnishes.


VOC emission levels (products) exemplary level criteria - KBCN0636

Where a project has not specified all the product categories of Hea 02, all products that have been specified must meet the testing requirements and emission levels criteria for Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) emissions, as outlined within the relevant table.  

VOC emission levels – products with no formaldehyde-containing materials - KBCN1137

Where a product manufacturer’s declaration confirms that a product contains no formaldehyde, this can be used to demonstrate compliance with both the standard and exemplary level criteria. However, where a manufacturer has made a declaration of formaldehyde class E1 without testing, this can only be used to demonstrate compliance with the standard criteria. An E1 declaration only confirms that emissions of formaldehyde are ≤0.12 mg/m3, so this would not be valid evidence to demonstrate compliance with the exemplary level criteria emission limits. As such, the manufacturer would need to provide additional information (e.g. test report) to show that emissions from the product meet the relevant exemplary level emission limit.

VOC product types – other - KBCN0698

Where a product does not appear to fit into any of the defined VOC product types listed in the manual this does not mean it is automatically exempt from being assessed. If it is similar to one of the listed product types and clearly could have an impact on VOC levels it should normally be assessed. In such cases the supplier/manufacturer should seek to demonstrate that their product meets the equivalent standards required for the closest matching product type.

VOC testing – alternative methods for compliance for paints and varnishes - KBCN0492

Manufacturers' calculations of VOC content, based on the constituent ingredients, can be used to demonstrate compliance with the testing requirement for paints and varnishes instead of ISO 11890-2:2013.

VOC testing – alternative testing standards for compliance for paints - KBCN1003

For the vast majority of paints, ISO 11890-2 will be the relevant testing standard, as indicated by the technical guidance. However, where stipulated in the performance standard (EU Directive 2004/42/CE), ASTMD 2369 can be used as the testing standard (ie where reactive diluents are present).

VOCs of Resin flooring products - KBCN0980

For the purposes of assessing the volatile organic compound emission levels of products, BREEAM considers resin flooring products such as epoxy floor coating, to fall within the scope of a ‘resilient floor covering’.

VOCs post-completion testing and KPI - KBCN0380

When testing for VOCs post-completion and pre-occupancy, a representative sample of the building needs to be carried out. Each sample TVOC and formaldehyde measurement needs to achieve the threshold levels individually, either in the initial testing or after remedial measures have been implemented. This ensures that all tested areas of the building are below the limits, and that areas of non-compliance are not ‘averaged out’. 'When providing KPI test results for air quality post-construction / pre-occupancy within scoring and reporting tool, where the limits are exceeded and remediation and re-testing are carried out, the figure should be an average for the whole building post-remediation, as this is the key figure that reflects the building at its certified state'. Where testing is not a requirement of the IAQ Plan and this is not carried out, the original testing figures should be entered and the assessment report should provide details of the remediation measures undertaken to reduce these to within the prescribed limits.
06/12/17 Amended to account for situations where re-testing is not required by the IAQ Plan.

Weather File Location - KBCN1013

In accordance with the guidance provided in CIBSE AM11, in instances where the weather file for the nearest location does not represent the most appropriate climatic conditions for the actual location, it is permissible to use the weather file from another, nearby location, which more closely matches the climate at the actual location. This can take account of the climatic influences of height above sea level, a coastal location or other local, climate-moderating features such as mountains, woodland, lakes, prevailing wind direction or urban heat island effect.

Zoning and control – dimming - KBCN1018

Localised dimming controls installed in line with the criteria, along with a master on/off switch, can be considered as meeting the aim of the requirement for 'controls' in open plan offices. The aim is for occupants to have local control over their lighting and maintain comfortable lighting levels.

Zoning and control – PIR in circulation spaces - KBCN0332

PIR controls can be deemed compliant in circulation spaces such as corridors. In this instance 'separate occupant controls' are not required. The requirement for user control is so that the building users can have direct control over their immediate work environment to ensure it is suitable for their personal needs. In circulation spaces, occupancy is transient and PIR control in these spaces is acceptable.  

Zoning and occupant control – access to lighting controls - KBCN00032

In building areas where building users, for example the general public, are not expected to have access to lighting controls, these areas can be excluded from the assessment. The aim of these criteria is to increase user control of lighting. Where user control is not applicable, such as on a shop floor, the criteria should not be applied.

Zoning and occupant control – control via BMS - KBCN0703

Occupant control via a BMS is not normally considered a compliant BREEAM solution. Any solution that requires the action of a third party (eg facilities manager) is not considered under the control of the occupant. Solutions where all relevant building occupants have control via a user-interface via BMS may be considered compliant where the assessor is satisfied that the aim of the criteria are met. User-control must be available directly to the occupant.
01/08/2017 - KBCN applicability to Thermal comfort Issue removed.

Zoning and occupant control – PIR detection systems - KBCN0335

The aim of the Health & Wellbeing category is to recognise ways to benefit occupants through giving them control of their lighting environment. Without manual overrides, presence or absence detection lighting controls (such as PIR detection systems) are not compliant with the criteria. BREEAM recognises the energy efficiency benefits of detection systems in buildings through the Energy category. In some cases, the design team may have to prioritise one particular lighting strategy to the detriment of achieving a credit elsewhere.
28 04 2021 Wording amended to include absence detection systems.
18 09 2017 Wording amended to clarify the meaning.
 

Zoning and occupant control – whiteboards and display screens - KBCN1433

Whiteboards and display screens in dedicated teaching or presentation spaces require separate zoning and control for lighting, as specified in the criteria. Lighting around whiteboards and display screens which are typically found in general office areas, meeting rooms, or in other generic spaces do not require separate zoning and control to meet the criteria. In such cases, the assessor should provide justification. Whiteboards and display screens in dedicated teaching / presentation spaces are likely to be used frequently, and require appropriate zoning and control. An increasing number of offices and meeting rooms now include display screens - however separate zoning and control may not be appropriate.

Zoning and occupant controls – handheld remote controls - KBCN1243

Remote control light switches can be considered as compliant, on the basis that these are provided in sufficient numbers/locations to meet the aim of the criteria.

[KBCN withdrawn] ~ Ventilation – BB101 - KBCN1242

This KBCN has been withdrawn and is no longer valid. This is because Building Bulletin 101 was updated in August 2018. 
KBCN withdrawn on 04/02/2019:

The web page that hosts the currently active version of Building Bulletin 101: ventilation for school buildings, available here, states that the document was published on 11th March 2014. However, when opening the document itself, the publishing date refers to '5th July 2006'.

The current version of the standard which should be used is Version 1.4 dated 5th July 2006 within the document.

Information correct as of 26thOctober 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.