New Construction / UK / 2011 /

00 General

Information correct as of 23rdJune 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.

Compliance: Applicability of criteria to subsequent schemes’ versions - KBCN0554

When assessing a project under a certain scheme, criteria or compliance notes from a previous scheme cannot be used to demonstrate compliance.

Compliance: Applicability of criteria to scheme’s previous versions - KBCN0430

Criteria set for a scheme version are not applicable retrospectively to previous versions.

Compliance: Conflicts of interest for the BREEAM assessor - KBCN0107

The assessor can be someone within the design team or work for the same company as the design team member(s) but the assessor must identify and manage any potential conflicts of interest. The assessor should also make BRE Global aware of the situation so that, should it prove appropriate, the certification report can be escalated to a more detailed level of quality assurance checking. If the assessor is a member of the company who are producing evidence to demonstrate compliance, there must be clear separation of the roles and the BREEAM/HQM assessor must not be personally responsible for producing such evidence. BREEAM/HQM is a 3rd party certification scheme. Therefore, it is important to avoid any conflicts of interest between those producing evidence and those awarding credits to ensure the robustness of the certification process. 

Compliance: Manufacturer/supplier does not comply - KBCN0571

Where equipment is required to meet specific criteria to achieve compliance it is important to ensure the client seeks out manufacturers/suppliers that provide equipment which meets these criteria. If the chosen product / supplier cannot meet the criteria then the credit cannot be awarded. BREEAM seeks to recognise the use of equipment which offers the latest sustainable solutions.

Compliance: Statutory requirements - KBCN0395

BREEAM is an assessment method which promotes best practice in sustainable buildings. Matters critical to health and safety, as well as any mandatory requirements from statutory authorities which conflict with BREEAM criteria may take precedence over BREEAM requirements. In this instance, evidence would be required to demonstrate that this is the case. Note, this does not change the criteria requirements, and where BREEAM requirements are not met the design team must explore alternative options or specifications if the relevant credits are to be awarded.
17/04/18 Wording amended to clarify

Definition of NIA (net floor area) for assessment registration purposes - KBCN0569

Net Internal Area (NIA) is broadly the usable area within a building measured to the face of the internal finish of perimeter or party walls ignoring skirting boards and taking each floor into account. NIA will include: NIA will exclude: Source: Valuation Office Agency Therefore, the usable area within a building measured to the face of the internal walls should be provided. Whilst this is not expected to be accurate to the nearest 1m2, the closest estimate possible for the NFA should be entered. This is to allow for any possible subsequent adjustment to the size of the development.

Dementia care homes - KBCN0820

For dementia care homes, there may be instances where the resident profile, and hence design and use, result in some BREEAM criteria being considered inappropriate or not applicable. Where this is the case assessors should seek confirmation from BREEAM through the technical query service, providing a clear justification for why specific criteria cannot be met. Before submitting a query, however, please review the BREEAM Knowledge Base under the relevant Scheme and Issue, to check for a specific, published compliance note. Assessors will be required to provide evidence. This could be from suitable individuals/organisations regarding the specific project, detailing how the criteria is not relevant for the individual project.

Evidence: Final design/’as-built’ drawings as evidence - KBCN0393

Where drawings are not clearly marked to indicate their 'as-built' status, additional evidence would need to be provided by the design team to confirm the drawings represent the completed development and that there have been no changes relevant to the BREEAM/HQM assessment. This could, for example, be a written confirmation from the architect or the contractor, as appropriate.

Evidence: Post construction assessment evidence - KBCN0407

For the purposes of robustness and completeness, both design AND post-construction stage evidence is required for a post construction assessment. However, it is possible to provide only post construction stage (PCS) evidence where it is clear that this completely supersedes the design stage (DS) evidence and renders it unnecessary.

Fully-fitted assessments with shell & core areas – 75% GLA guidance - KBCN0379

Where a single assessment of a fully-fitted development, with a small proportion of shell and core has been permitted, the guidance relating to 75% of the floor area being covered by a GLA (see Appendix D) must be 75% of the shell & core area, excluding the fully-fitted area.
13/01/2017 - Re-formatted and amended for clarity.

GN01 NC 2011 Assessment Reporting - KBCN0610

Introduction This guidance is intended to clarify the procedure for producing assessment reports for certification using the BREEAM New Construction 2011 assessment scoring and reporting tool and assessment references tab. View full Guidance Note (licensed assessors only) View all Guidance Notes (licensed assessors only)

GN03 Scheme classifications of developments with domestic elements – BREEAM New Construction 2011 - KBCN0615

Scheme classifications of developments with domestic elements - BREEAM New Construction 2011 Introduction This document provides guidance for BREEAM scheme classifications of developments with domestic elements and reflects where buildings consisting of self-contained dwellings and/or rooms for residential purposes are suitable to be assessed under the BREEAM New Construction scheme 2011 version. View full Guidance Note (licensed assessors only) View all Guidance Notes (licensed assessors only)

GN10 Assessing mixed use developments and multiple buildings (or units) of similar function - KBCN0623

Summary The purpose of this Guidance Note is to assist BREEAM assessors with scheme classifications and the application of BREEAM for mixed use developments and developments with multiple buildings or units on the same site. Note: This guidance note has been revised to v1.0 April 2018 View full Guidance Note (licensed assessors only) View all Guidance Notes (licensed assessors only)
17/04/18 Wording clarified
04/06/18 Note added regarding revision and hyperlink updated

GN19 BREEAM UK New Construction 2011 scheme assessment timeline - KBCN0716

The assessment timeline has been produced to assist with optimising project sustainability performance. It outlines at which RIBA stage credits should be addressed and ideally when these should be considered by the design team, planner, contractors, owners/occupiers and other members of the project team to achieve the highest possible BREEAM rating at the minimum cost. It demonstrates that where BREEAM advice is taken on too late within the design and construction phases a number of BREEAM credits may not be achieved. View full Guidance Note (licensed assessors only) View all Guidance Notes (licensed assessors only)

GN23 BREEAM Bespoke Process - KBCN0720

This document contains information and guidance for BREEAM Assessors who are seeking to assess a bespoke project. This includes projects that meet one of the following options: — A building that does not fit the scope of the BREEAM New Construction and Refurbishment and Fit-Out schemes (UK and International) — A BREEAM Communities project outside of the UK — All BREEAM Infrastructure New Construction pilot projects. This document contains information and guidance for BREEAM Assessors on the operational and technical aspects of the BREEAM Bespoke Process. This document should be used alongside Operational Guidance (SD5070) and the relevant technical manual. View full Guidance Note (licensed assessors only) View all Guidance Notes (licensed assessors only)

Green Lease Agreement – reference to the technical manual - KBCN0881

The technical manual includes criteria, intended for the guidance and interpretation of licensed BREEAM assessors. It does not generally provide detailed practical solutions to meet the criteria. In the BREEAM UK New Construction 2011 and International New Construction 2013 schemes, Shell only/Shell & core assessments included provision for demonstrating compliance for fit-out items using a Green Lease Agreement (GLA). The future tenant and their design team should not have to rely on a licensed BREEAM assessor to assist them in interpreting the GLA to achieve a compliant fit-out. Specifications for achieving compliance must therefore be explicitly included within the GLA, with reference to the relevant BREEAM criteria, to allow the fit-out team to understand exactly what is required. A compliant Green Lease Agreement must be a robust alternative to the actual implementation or installation of fit-out measures. A Green Lease Agreement which relies solely on reference to the BREEAM Technical manual is not considered a robust solution. 

Green Lease Agreement: an alternative to - KBCN0378

A legally binding lease agreement between the developer and tenant which requires tenants to use a fit-out guide with mandatory BREEAM requirements can be considered a Green Lease Agreement. Green Lease Agreements refer to the mandatory BREEAM requirements. If the fit-out guide refers to non-mandatory BREEAM requirements, this can be considered a Green Building Guide.

Green lease agreements – developments with multiple tenants - KBCN0411

The 75% rule only applies to the floor areas of the building which are subject to a Green Lease Agreement. Areas of the building which are fully fitted or subject to any of the other shell and core options cannot contribute towards this rule.

Healthcare: BREEAM requirement - KBCN0472

From 1 July 2008, all health authorities in the UK (Department of Health, NHS Wales, NHS Scotland and the Department of Health Social Services and Public Safety of Northern Ireland) require new healthcare buildings seeking Outline of Business Case (OBC) approval to commit to an EXCELLENT rating (assessed against BREEAM New Construction) and all refurbishments (assessed against BREEAM Non-Domestic refurbishment and fit-out) to commit to a VERY GOOD rating. In Scotland, project specific requirements in relation to the BREEAM assessment will be dealt with by Health Facilities Scotland as part of the NHS Scotland Design Assessment Process. UK health authorities capital cost thresholds below which a BREEAM assessment is not required: England: where capital cost1 is <£2M. Scotland: where capital cost1 is <£2M. Note: For NHS Scotland Boards, reference should be made to the Scottish Capital Investment Manual (available on http://www.scim.scot.nhs.uk/), especially the business case guide, which sets out the BREEAM requirements for Healthcare buildings. Northern Ireland: where capital cost1 is <£2M. Note: In Northern Ireland, listed buildings do not require assessment. Wales: No minimum capital cost1 thresholds, however the Welsh Governments Planning Policy for all non-residential development applies. All Countries: Where the capital cost falls below the relevant threshold, a Pre-Assessment should still be undertaken (at the OBC stage) to determine whether BREEAM certification is appropriate to that project. 1. Total Capital Cost for Publicly Funded Build Schemes includes all the items contained in the Capital Investment Manual Cost Forms OB1/FB1 (i.e. Construction Works, Fees, Non-Works Costs, including Land Purchase, Statutory and Local Authority Charges, Decanting, Enabling and Temporary Works etc., Equipment, Contingencies, including Optimism Bias, and VAT, as applicable). The Total Capital Cost for Privately Funded Schemes includes all the same items as for Publicly Funded Schemes plus the cost of Financing the Capital (i.e. rolled up Interest, Banking Fees - Arrangement, Due Diligence, Lawyers etc. – Third party Equity Costs).

Healthcare: Privately owned healthcare developments - KBCN0481

Where the project goes through outline business case approval, the development will be expected to also comply with the requirement for BREEAM (where the ‘thresholds’ outlined in KBCN0472 are met). This is in line with the fact that all UK health authorities support the Governments’ commitment to the sustainable development agenda and recognises the importance of delivering on this agenda through the design and build process. In Scotland, project specific requirements in relation to the BREEAM assessment will be dealt with by Health Facilities Scotland as part of the NHS Scotland Design Assessment Process.

Healthcare: Reasons to achieve a BREEAM rating - KBCN0474

There are many reasons why organisations wish to achieve the required BREEAM rating:

Healthcare: Related publications/reports - KBCN0477

The following publications/reports might help in addition to the BREEAM New Construction Manuals to support in the understanding of BREEAM and sustainability in the NHS:

Healthcare: Required stages of assessment - KBCN0478

The requirement from the Department of Health (and other health authorities) embeds BREEAM in the design from the beginning of the design process: the target rating demonstrated in a Pre-Assessment for the Outline Business Case (OBC) approval or at RIBA stage 1 (Preparation and Brief). Appointing a licensed assessor early will ensure the assessment process is well planned and proceeds smoothly. Appointing a Sustainability Champion at this stage can also add credits. This will ensure sustainable buildings are delivered without resorting to ‘engineering fixes’ that are often a very expensive last resort. The Design Stage assessment should be carried out by a licensed assessor and the report submitted to BRE Global for Interim certification. This Interim certification would be used for Full Business Case (FBC) approval, or equivalent. The mandatory Post Construction Stage report has to be completed after practical completion and final certification demonstrated as part of the Post Project Evaluation (PPE).

Healthcare: The NHS & BREEAM - KBCN0475

The Department of Health supports the Government’s commitment to the sustainable development agenda and recognises the importance of delivering on this agenda through the design and build process. As the successors to NEAT BREEAM Healthcare 2008, and going forward with BREEAM New Construction (which incorporates Healthcare buildings), supports that process to ensure standards continue to improve. This is further reinforced through HTM 07-07 Sustainable health and social care buildings: Planning, design, construction and refurbishment. BREEAM is a Government requirement under:

Laboratory containment level category definitions - KBCN0943

BRE does not designate or define containment levels for laboratories. The categories listed in the manuals are based on industry standard definitions. For further information, please refer to HSE/COSHH or DEFRA definitions, depending upon the hazard type.

Master plans with multiple stakeholders - KBCN0953

Assessment of a building forming part of a master plan co-ordinated by a third party (developer or local authority) In such cases, it may not be possible for the design team to control elements affecting issues such as land use and ecology, access, external lighting and surface water pollution. It is therefore acceptable for the assessor to define the assessment boundary according to one of two following options:
  1. Restrict the boundary only to what the design team can control.
  2. Extend the boundary to include elements of the master plan, assessing any associated benefits or disadvantages that arise. Relevant Knowledge Base Compliance Notes should be reviewed, and BREEAM Technical contacted for additional guidance if required.
The assessment boundary must remain consistent throughout all issues. Facilities outside of the boundary but serving the assessment (i.e. cycle facilities, parking etc) can be assessed as standard. Assessment of a building forming part of a master plan co-ordinated by the design team with third party elements Where there are third party elements in the master plan which are not BREEAM compliant (e.g. external lighting by local authority), evidence should be submitted to QA that efforts have been made with the third party to align these elements with BREEAM criteria. Where this is not possible, these elements can be excluded. Full justification should be provided when submitting the assessment for certification.

Multiple assessments: Site-wide certificate - KBCN0874

Where developments on a site are assessed under multiple BREEAM registrations, but there is a requirement for an overall, site-wide BREEAM rating, an additional certificate can be produced for the whole development. For further details of this service and applicable fees, please contact the BREEAM technical team.
17/04/2018 Amended to clarify
 

Part Shell and Core Part Fully Fitted assessment - KBCN0426

This CN has been suspended and is currently undergoing technical review.

Process Notes - KBCN0611

Process notes can be accessed by licensed assessors here. When a new process note has been released, you may be required to tick the box to confirm you have read the note to be able to access other documents in BREEAM Projects. To do this scroll to the bottom of the Process Note index page and tick the box and click next.  

Process: Project team member no longer operational - KBCN0590

In situations where a member of the project team is no longer operational, for example where a company has gone in to liquidation or administration, and the assessor is unable to obtain the required evidence to meet the requirements of BREEAM schemes and HQM, any credits affected must be withheld. Whilst BRE appreciate and sympathise with the circumstances surrounding these types of situations, BREEAM schemes and HQM rely upon an auditable trail of evidence with which to award credits. This trail of evidence is used to demonstrate how criteria have been met. BREEAM standards and HQM must be applied consistently to all developments undertaking assessment to ensure that certificates issued provide an accurate and consistent representation of the level achieved. If the necessary evidence cannot be presented and the assessor deems it insufficient to demonstrate compliance in accordance with the schedule of evidence then credits should not be awarded.

Process: Registration date and applicable scheme manual issue - KBCN0708

Typically the scheme technical manual issue which is current when a project is registered should be used for the assessment. For example, if a BREEAM UK New Construction 2014 development was registered on 01/07/2016, the current issue of the scheme technical manual at that point would be issue 4.1, which was published on 11/03/2016 (the next issue 5.0 of the technical manual was published on 05/09/2016). However, it is permissible for the assessor to decide to use a later issue of the technical manual. The scheme technical manual version and issue used for the assessment should be clearly referenced within the assessment report. Note that in any case, the same technical manual version and issue should be used for the entire assessment. It is not acceptable to assess different credits based on different issues of the technical manual and it is not acceptable to change issues between submissions of the assessment.
26 09 17 Clarification added that the 'Issue' of the technical manual may not be changed between assessment submissions

RIBA Stages 2007/2013 - KBCN0404

RIBA has published guidance on equating 2007 RIBA stages to the revised Plan of Work 2013. Please see publication 'RIBA Plan of Work 2013 Overview' which can be downloaded from the RIBA website www.architecture.com.  

Scheme classification – Education - KBCN0398

The Education scheme classification criteria is tailored to the requirements of buildings that are likely to be used by large numbers of students, whose requirements differ slightly from the general population. Where a building on an education campus, or owned by an educational institution: - is not used for teaching / study - is primarily used by staff or other non-students - and transport requirements differ from a standard Education building The building may be assessed under a different, more appropriate scheme classification. Where it is unclear how this building should be assessed, a scheme classification query should be submitted.  

Scheme classification based on anticipated occupancy & building use - KBCN0421

In the instance where there is potential for the building occupancy and use to change during the building lifetime, scheme classification should be based on the most likely occupancy and use of the building as anticipated at the time of the assessment. Please refer to Guidance Note 10 (GN10) for further details

Scheme classification queries - KBCN0540

As the Operational Guidance clarifies ‘…A scheme classification requires the assessor, client or design team to submit floor plans showing the layout of the building(s) along with its intended functional areas and any other relevant information. BRE Global will then confirm the appropriate means of assessing the development, using either one or more standard schemes or by developing project-specific bespoke criteria…’ BREEAM Technical cannot definitively confirm a scheme classification in the absence of drawings. Relevant information could also include specification of the scope of works, clarification of general building functions, spaces within them, as well as their management and access to the public.  

Scope: Assessment of apart-hotels - KBCN0396

Where the apart- hotel has been classed as ADL2a by building control and therefore not considered as 'self -contained dwellings', BREEAM Other buildings Residential Institutions assessment should be used to assess it. However, if the building is classified by building control as ADL1a (‘new dwellings’) and therefore considered as 'self-contained dwellings' then it would not be appropriate to use BREEAM New Construction Other buildings Residential Institutions. Where this is the case floors plans and details of the operation of the building (e.g. management of apart/hotels, cleaning and other services, etc.) should be submitted to BRE for confirmation.  

Scope: Mixed BREEAM CSH/HQM developments - KBCN0383

In general terms, any relevant areas or facilities which serve the building should be included in the BREEAM assessment, regardless of whether they are also assessed under CSH/HQM. Whilst CSH is a Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) scheme, it was developed by BRE Global and the requirements are generally aligned with BREEAM. This should not, therefore involve the duplication of work, but means that the same evidence can be applied to each scheme as appropriate.  

Shell & Core – ‘Condition of sale agreements’ as evidence - KBCN0485

A 'condition of sale agreement' provides a less robust solution than a 'green lease agreement' and cannot be used to demonstrate compliance under Option 1. Conversely, a Green Building Guide (Option 2) whilst considered less robust than Option 1, would be equally likely to be implemented, whether the building were leased or sold. Where a shell & core building is being developed for sale, it is therefore acceptable for half credits to be awarded on the basis of a Green Building Guide. This includes mandatory credits/minimum standards, but only for Issues where a green Building Guide is a recognised route to compliance as indicated in the guidance.

Shell & core options where tenants become known before final certification - KBCN0858

In such situations the route to demonstrating compliance may change from that at design stage certification. The following approaches to some possible scenarios should be followed:
  1. Where tenants become known and a Green Building Guide (Option 2) is supported by the tenants' own compliant fit-out specification, full credits can be awarded on the basis of Option 3.
  2. Where tenants become known and the developer has fulfilled their obligation in producing a compliant Green Building Guide (Option 2) at the appropriate time and provided this to the prospective tenant, half credits can be awarded regardless of whether the tenant follows the guide.
  3. If the tenants become known and a Green Lease Agreement (Option 1) will not be signed and complied with in full, the GLA is no longer valid. Where relevant, a revised GLA document must be produced, signed and enforced for credits to be awarded. No recognition can be given for any Issues in the original GLA which will not be complied with as the superseded GLA cannot be retrospectively considered as a Green Building Guide.

Shell & core project: Completing as fully-fitted - KBCN0394

It is possible to complete an assessment as fully fitted following a design stage certification as a shell & core project. Whilst the assessment will reference much of the same evidence gathered for design stage, it must be re-registered and may be submitted as a fully-fitted Post-construction assessment.
17/04/18 Wording clarified

Shell and Core – Green Lease Agreements – 75% rule - KBCN0392

The 75% rule, referred to in Appendix D Option 1, only applies to the floor areas of the building which are subject to a Green Lease Agreement. Areas which are fully fitted or subject to either of the other shell and core options cannot contribute towards this.

Shell and Core Options – Change option between Design Stage and Post Construction - KBCN0595

It is acceptable for the Shell and Core option to change between Design Stage and Post Construction Review. For example, Option 1 (Green Lease Agreement) could be used to award credits in the Design Stage assessment. As a project progresses, if a tenant was found, Option 3 (Tenant collaboration) could then be used to award credits in the Post Construction stage assessment.

Shell only/shell and core assessments and applicability of minimum standards - KBCN0612

For BREEAM Issues where the Minimum Standard refers to work which falls outside the scope of a shell only/shell and core assessment, as noted in the technical manual, the Minimum Standard is not applicable. This affords shell only/shell and core projects the potential to achieve their target BREEAM ratings.

Simple Buildings – definition - KBCN0448

The building services are predominantly of limited capacity and local in their delivery, largely independent from other systems in the building fabric and avoid complex control systems. The building can be classified as any of the building types within the scope of the scheme, including mixed use developments or building types. For UK NC 2011 assessments please refer to the Simple Buildings Guidance on the Extranet. For UK NC 2014, 2018 and UK RFO 2014 please refer to Appendix E within each technical manual.

Simple Buildings – Additional training - KBCN0464

The Simple Buildings technical guidance does not constitute a separate BREEAM scheme. It is an approach which can be applied to developments which meet the relevant BREEAM definition. This means that a suitably trained, qualified and licensed assessor can conduct a Simple Buildings assessment without further training.

Simple Buildings – Category weightings - KBCN0458

Category weightings are the same for standard and Simple Buildings assessments.

Simple Buildings – connecting to existing services - KBCN00037

Where a building extension will connect to existing building services, a Simple Buildings assessment can be carried out if the total services systems is of limited capacity and complexity conforming to the definition and scope of a Simple Building. Refer to the Applicability of Simple Buildings assessments for more detailed information. For example, the total capacity, when assessing the space and/or hot water heating services, must be less the 100kW. Compliance would be met by any of the following: The assessment (in this case, extension) cannot be assessed against the Simple Buildings methodology if the definition of a Simple Buildings is not meet. 

Simple Buildings – Introduction and robustness of Simple Buildings criteria set - KBCN0454

Simple Buildings criteria have been developed to meet the need expressed by stakeholders for a simplified and cost effective approach for the assessment of less complex buildings. The standards and robustness of a BREEAM rated building have not been compromised by the development of Simple buildings criteria. The criteria have been carefully reviewed to be more in line with and relevant to simpler buildings and servicing strategies.

Simple Buildings – No size or cost limits - KBCN0451

Variations in project specification make setting limits on the size or the cost of simple buildings problematic. Therefore, no limits have been set.

Simple Buildings – Quality Assurance (QA) - KBCN0459

The process and rigor of quality assurance does not change for Simple Building assessments.  As with any assessment, the correct classification of the development will be checked.  Where a project is incorrectly classified, the project will require re-assessment against the correct BREEAM criteria before the QA and certification process can progress. There may be additional charges associated with this process. Due to Simple Buildings not being a separate scheme, the audit level assigned to the assessment (Admin, Partial or Full) will follow the standard approach, i.e. previous audit records for that building type will be reviewed. Also, QA response times are the same as for other assessments of the same building type.

Simple Buildings – Use of BMS - KBCN0948

Where a building does not require complex controls, but a BMS is installed primarily for its monitoring capabilities, this does not preclude assessment using the simple buildings criteria set. Buildings which require complex control systems cannot be considered as simple.  

Simple Buildings: Applicability of Shell & Core - KBCN0397

Shell and Core options cannot normally be applied to Simple Buildings with the following exception; - The Simple Buildings classification must be based on the full fit-out of the speculative building.  This may be achieved through Shell and Core Option 3 (developer-tenant collaboration) only. If the project team is unable to demonstrate this (for example where the end-user is unknown or the end-use is uncertain) the full version of BREEAM New Construction must be used. Shell and Core Option 3 ensures a collaborative process between the developer and tenant which allows the assessor to be certain of the end fully-fitted specification. Thus the assessor can be certain that, in its fully-fitted state, the building will still fall within the remit of a 'Simple Building'.   

Technical: Scope of BREEAM UK New Construction 2014 versus 2011 - KBCN0494

Under BREEAM UK New Construction (NC) 2014, building types fall within four broad sector categories; commercial, public sector, multi-residential and ‘other buildings’; each sector containing a sub-group of buildings which can be assessed using the 2014 version e.g. commercial sector includes offices, retail and industrial types. In addition to the building types covered by the BREEAM UK NC 2011 scheme, fire stations and visitor centres are included within the scope of the BREEAM UK NC 2014 scheme. Also, the criteria for Simple Buildings are fully integrated in the BREEAM UK NC 2014 scheme, whilst revised guidance is included for the assessment of shell only and shell and core projects.

Tenant fit-out of asset prior to PCR, where DS compliance is based on Option 2 - KBCN0412

If a tenant begins the fit-out in line with the Green Building Guide before the post-construction report submission, the assessor can award full credits for criteria met  based on 'Option 3 Developer/Tenant Collaboration'. The assessor would need to collect evidence of the fit-out as normal for a post-construction assessment or review. If a tenant chooses not to follow the Green Building Guide provided to them, the assessor can still award half credits in accordance with Option 2. In order to provide transparency to future occupants of the building, the assessor's post construction report must record where the tenants have chosen not to follow the Green Building Guide.
While it is recognised that the tenant is not following the Green Building Guide, the developer has fulfilled their obligations in providing the necessary documentation for the Shell and Core assessment and has influenced the tenants' decisions as far as possible.
05/04/2018 Wording clarified
 

Time critical BREEAM requirements – reference to RIBA (or equivalent) work stages - KBCN1156

As a building design process passes through successive work stages, increasingly more aspects of the design become fixed. BREEAM criteria often require actions at, before or after specific project work stages, as these are the optimal stages to achieve the required sustainability outcome. When undertaken at a different stage, the criteria may be difficult to comply with, opportunities may be missed, options limited or costs may become prohibitive. Knowing which stage your project is at Where possible, BREEAM refers to industry-standard work stages, for example the RIBA plan of work stages. However different project teams can interpret these referenced stages differently. Furthermore, many projects do not follow these stages in a simple linear fashion for all aspects of the design at the same time. For instance, the envelope design may be well advanced even to the point where installation has commenced before any specification decisions have been made on some interior finishes. As such, a project may not be at one project stage for all elements of the design at any one point in time. This Knowledge Base compliance note is intended to provide supplementary information to enable projects to determine what stage they are at with respect to time critical BREEAM requirements, including where different elements are at different stages. Although project team members may be willing to offer their opinion on the stage the project has reached, this will often be subjective and hence inconsistent. Therefore, the process set out here looks at the currently available design information for the project (e.g. drawings, specifications) to determine the current work stage in relation to the issue under consideration. This provides a more objective, demonstrable approach for the assessor to follow.   Concept Design Stage The RIBA definition of ‘Concept Design’ (RIBA stage 2) can be found here https://www.ribaplanofwork.com/PlanOfWork.aspx . The core objective given is ‘Prepare Concept Design, including outline proposals for structural design, building services systems, outline specifications and preliminary Cost Information along with relevant Project Strategies in accordance with Design Programme. Agree alterations to brief and issue Final Project Brief.’ Table 1 and table 2 (in the link below) provide further guidance, specific to BREEAM, to help determine whether a project, or part of the project relevant to the issue/credit, is at ‘Concept Design’ stage. If there is ambiguity or uncertainty about the stage of the project, the assessor should check with the design team whether the design documentation (drawings, specifications, BIM etc.) currently being produced by the design team will generally include the information listed. It is possible for different aspects of the project to be at different stages in terms of how progressed the design is. For example, the substructure design may be at technical design or even installed while the internal partitions are still at concept design. Whether this matters depends on the issue/credit being pursued. The following steps take this into account. Step 1 First, for the issue/credit being pursued, determine which of the relevant assessment scope items in table 1 and 2 are relevant. For example, if the issue/credit only relates to substructure, then only the substructure assessment scope items shall be considered. If the issue/credit is of a general nature concerning the whole project, then all the assessment scope items shall be considered. Step 2 For the relevant assessment scope items from step 1, decide which of the following applies the most: - Please note that the items listed are indicative of the typical information produced at ‘Concept Design’ stage. Technical Design Stage The RIBA definition of ‘Technical Design’ (RIBA stage 4) can be found here https://www.ribaplanofwork.com/PlanOfWork.aspx . The core objective provided is ‘Prepare Technical Design in accordance with Design Responsibility Matrix and Project Strategies to include all architectural, structural and building services information, specialist subcontractor design and specifications, in accordance with Design Programme.’ The following provides further guidance, specific to BREEAM, to determine whether a project is at the ‘Technical Design’ stage: The RIBA plan of work definition of ‘Technical Design’ clearly states that it should ‘…include all architectural, structural and building services information, specialist subcontractor design and specifications…’. Therefore, it is a simpler task to determine whether the project, or part of the project relevant to the issue/credit, is at this stage. If there is ambiguity or uncertainty about the stage of the project, the assessor should check with the design team whether the design documentation (drawings, specifications, BIM etc.) currently under production by the design team (and the contractor’s specialist sub-contractors, if applicable) will, when finished, generally include all the final design information required for the construction works on-site. Like concept design, it is possible for different aspects of the project to be at different stages in terms of how progressed the design is. The following steps take this into account. Step 1 First, for the issue/credit being pursued, determine which of the relevant assessment scope items are relevant (the assessment scope items given in table 1 and 2 may be used, but the rest of the information in these tables relates to concept design). Step 2 For the relevant assessment scope items from step 1, decide which of the following applies the most: - KBCN1156_IndicatorTables  
17/06/2019 KBCN updated to provide additional guidance

Tools: Assessment details tab in reporting tool – heating type info unavailable - KBCN0406

While the Assessment details tab asks for heating and cooling types your selection for the type of heating or cooling system does not affect the number of credits. The number of credits are influenced only if heating or cooling systems are applicable or not. Therefore, for a situation where the design is in early stages and the building services details have not been decided, your selection simply needs to confirm whether or not the building is heated and whether or not the building is cooled using the drop down menus for “Building services – heating system type” and “Building services – cooling system type”. This must be completed for the assessment tool to function.  

Tools: Tracker+ - KBCN0760

Please note that Tracker+ is not a BRE-owned or managed reporting tool. For issues concerning Tracker + please contact the provider (Southfacing) as the BRE cannot advise on technical issues relating to Tracker+.

Tools: Use of reissued tools - KBCN0384

The most up-to-date version of an excel tool should be downloaded from the BREEAM Assessor's Extranet when a new assessment is started. If an updated tool is subsequently released then it will not be necessary to use the updated tool instead of the version already being used. The assessor can choose to use the updated tool if they wish. When new tool versions are released, assessors are notified through the monthly Process Note. We would expect Assessors to review the 'Schedule of Changes' tab when an updated tool is released. If fundamental changes have been made to the tool and they will affect the results for the issue in question please contact BRE for guidance.
Information correct as of 23rdJune 2021. Please see kb.breeam.com for the latest compliance information.